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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Improved hygiene during pandemic might be to blame for muckier wastewater coming out of Liberty Lake plant

The antibacterial soaps and bleach that people are using to sanitize themselves and their homes may be killing the bugs that are needed to treat sewage at the Liberty Lake Sewer and Water District, officials say. There’s no imminent threat to river health, but it’s a strange wrinkle to public health as residents do their part to stop the spread of the novel coronavirus.

Then and Now: Aubrey L. White Parkway

The road through Riverside State Park was named the Aubrey L. White Parkway in 1936 after a bookish young man from New Jersey with a head for business and a love of gardening.

Then and Now: Post Falls Lumber Co.

For most of the 20th century, there were several lumber mills along the Spokane River in Idaho. Tugboats would tow rafts of logs to the mills. One of the first mills was built by Frederick Post in the late 1880s at Post Falls.

Then and Now: Union Pacific rail yard

Now the site of the Kendall Yards mixed use development, the area northwest of downtown Spokane and the river was once home to the Union Pacific rail yard. The railroad moved out of the area in 1955, but development of new housing, retail and commercial businesses did not proceed in earnest until after the economic downturn of 2008.

Former wastewater director: Spokane’s nearly $200 million sewer overflow tanks not big enough

Dale Arnold, who served as the wastewater director under Mayor Mary Verner and supported a more expensive plan to reduce pollutants in the Spokane River, said the new regime at City Hall has an opportunity to push for more necessary clean-up. A multimillion dollar project, the largest infrastructure investment in the city’s history, is expected to finish this year when the last tank designed to trap stormwater and sewer runoff becomes operational downtown.

Then and Now: Spokane River Shacktown

A population of transient workers and pensioners swelled to more than 100 residents after World War II, but the city’s boosters dismantled it shortly thereafter.

Then and Now: Greenacres, Washington

The planned settlement 10 miles east of Spokane was envisioned as a fruit-growing paradise. Irrigation canals were dug to draw water from Liberty Lake, but after several decades, the number of apple orchards in Greenacres dwindled.

Spokane fire crews rescue man from Spokane River

Spokane Fire Department crews rescued a man from the Spokane River below the Post Street Bridge early Thursday after a person near the bridge reported a man screaming for help from the edge of the river just before 1 a.m.