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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Judge says VA Montana retaliated against whistleblower

A senior U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs official in Montana harassed and retaliated against an employee in violation of the federal Whistleblower Protection Act because the worker filed a patient safety report over an operating room error, a judge ruled Friday.

Congressional report slams NSA leaker Edward Snowden

A House intelligence committee report on National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden says he’s not a whistleblower and that the vast majority of the documents he stole were military and defense secrets that had nothing to do with Americans’ privacy.

SEC awards $22 million to Monsanto whistleblower

A former Monsanto financial executive who blew the whistle on the company’s accounting practices has been awarded a $22.4 million share of the government’s settlement with Monsanto, according to his lawyer.

Eye on Boise: Idaho college funding still lagging

A new national report charts reduced state investment in higher education and rising tuition across the country, with Idaho ranking fairly poorly – the report found that state spending on higher ed per student in Idaho remains 30.8 percent below pre-recession levels, when adjusted for inflation, the seventh-highest percentage in the country.

Cop code of silence: Chicago mayor caught in middle of legal battle

In an unprecedented move, city attorneys on Friday offered to admit to a federal jury that a code of silence exists in the Chicago Police Department if it meant Mayor Rahm Emanuel would not have to testify about it at the upcoming trial involving two whistleblower cops.

Clearwater Paper ordered to pay $235,000 to whistleblower

A federal judge has ordered Clearwater Paper Corp. to pay a former employee $235,000 after ruling the company fired him for filing a report with a federal agency about unsafe working conditions at the company’s sawmill in Lewiston, Idaho.

Julian Assange claims total vindication with U.N. panel ruling

A little-known United Nations human rights panel has sided with WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange in his long-running battle with Swedish and British authorities, saying he should be allowed to walk free from his embassy hideaway and compensated for the years he has lost.

Feds accuse Valley company Monaco Enterprises of overbilling military

Federal prosecutors accuse a Spokane Valley manufacturer of systematically overbilling the U.S. military, potentially involving hundreds of contracts spanning more than five years. The allegations against Monaco Enterprises were first raised in two whistleblower lawsuits filed in 2012. Government investigators conducted a multiyear inquiry of their own and decided to take over the case, finding that Monaco Enterprises billed the military for “services not actually provided and … concealed deceptive charging practices from the government with regards to travel costs,” according to a news release from the U.S. attorney’s office in Spokane.

Spokane Valley’s Monaco Enterprises accused of overbilling U.S. military

Federal prosecutors accuse a Spokane Valley manufacturer of systematically overbilling the U.S. military, potentially involving hundreds of contracts over more than five years. The allegations against Monaco Enterprises were first raised in two whistleblower lawsuits filed in 2012. Government investigators conducted a multi-year inquiry of their own and decided to take over the case, finding that Monaco Enterprises billed the military for “services not actually provided and… concealed deceptive charging practices from the government with regards to travel costs,” according to a news release from the U.S. Attorney’s office in Spokane.

Idaho juvenile corrections employees say agency stalling over records

BOISE – A group of Idaho Department of Juvenile Corrections employees who filed a whistleblower lawsuit against the state say the agency is violating a judge’s order to meet and decide which documents should be made public. Attorney Andrew Schoppe filed court documents Wednesday alleging the agency has been stalling for months in an effort to keep the public from learning the details of allegations that some staffers sexually abused juveniles at a Nampa detention center. U.S. District Judge B. Lynn Winmill recently gave agency officials two weeks to discuss with the plaintiffs which records should be kept secret, but Schoppe says that deadline has passed.