Arrow-right Camera
The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
Rain 49° Rain

Tag search results

Tags let us describe our content with keywords, making it easier to find what you're most interested in. Use the search box to look for tags, or explore our coverage with the lists below.

Ex-chief justice joins police use of force panel

A recently retired state Supreme Court justice has agreed to serve on a city commission examining how the Spokane Police Department uses force. The membership of the city’s Use of Force Commission, which was created last year to review the city’s handling of the police confrontation that resulted in the death of Otto Zehm in 2006, was announced by City Council President Ben Stuckart at Monday’s council meeting. The council is set to confirm the membership next week.

Condon team big on ideas – and jargon

If you were hoping that Mayor David Condon would “manage” the city more effectively, take heart. His transition team’s report this week was spectacularly managerial: It was full to the brim of organizational jargon and cliché.

Verner preceded her exit with request for back pay

In her final days as Spokane’s mayor, Mary Verner decided that she wanted a raise. After voluntarily capping her annual pay at about $100,000 for four years – and pledging to do the same in a second term if re-elected – Verner changed her mind after losing the November election and issued a formal request Dec. 29 for about $140,000 in uncollected back pay from the final two years of her term. If that wasn’t possible, Verner requested that her retirement benefits be calculated as if she had earned the full mayoral salary of about $170,000 a year.

Verner, fire union reached deal

Former Spokane Mayor Mary Verner and the leadership of the city’s fire union tentatively agreed to a new contract in the final days of Verner’s term. But the deal still needs approval of the union’s membership and the new City Council. Mayor David Condon will be able to make a recommendation to the council, but he can’t otherwise stop the deal.

Mayor, officials endorse Chase commission plan

Spokane’s youth programs would remain independent from other nonprofit groups under a new plan that has support from Mayor David Condon. Former Mayor Mary Verner, whose 2012 budget eliminated the city’s Youth Department, originally proposed contracting with the YMCA or other nonprofit groups to oversee youth activities and the Chase Youth Commission. But after opposition emerged from the commission, she backed a plan crafted by General Administration Director Dorothy Webster to give the money and oversight responsibilities to the commission and its partner organization, the Chase Youth Foundation.

Mayor vows to restore confidence in police

A 26-year veteran of the Spokane Police Department will lead the troubled agency, at least for the next few months. On his first business day as Spokane’s mayor, David Condon appointed Maj. Scott Stephens interim police chief and announced plans to review the department’s use-of-force policies and training.

Interim chief has spent career with Spokane Police Department

Scott Stephens grew up in Spokane and graduated from Gonzaga Preparatory School in 1979. He attended Eastern Washington University but never earned a degree. He was recently accepted to the University of Oklahoma and plans to earn his degree online. Stephens has been in law enforcement for 26 years, all of which have been spent with the Spokane Police Department. He started as an officer, was promoted to 1st Class patrolman, then spent six years as a sergeant before he was promoted to lieutenant. He was a lieutenant for 12 years, which included time overseeing the major crimes unit. He served as major for two years and was appointed acting assistant police chief in October when former Assistant Chief Jim Nicks took medical leave. He has experience as commander of investigations and in administration and patrol bureaus.

Spokane’s new mayor takes the reins

Now all David Condon has to do is wait. After a year of researching, campaigning, debating and fundraising in what some thought was a long-shot bid to become mayor of the second-largest city in Washington, Condon took the final step required by law to take office. He took the oath to become Spokane’s 44th mayor Friday morning in a short ceremony in front of the Clocktower at Riverfront Park.

Changes begin among city staff as three top administrators depart

Even before he officially took office, Mayor-elect David Condon shook up City Hall on Friday when he informed three top administrators that they won’t be back to serve with him as mayor. Receiving notice were City Administrator Ted Danek, Public Works and Utilities Director Dave Mandyke and General Administration Director Dorothy Webster.