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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Taliban attack Afghan forces in country’s north, killing 14

The Taliban targeted a pro-government militia compound in northern Afghanistan before dawn on Monday, killing 14 members of the Afghan security forces, a local official said. The Taliban quickly claimed responsibility for the attack.

US soldier is killed in Afghanistan; Taliban claim attack

An American service member was killed in combat Monday in Afghanistan, the U.S. military said, without providing further details, while the Taliban claimed they were behind a roadside bombing in northern Kunduz province that killed the U.S. soldier.

Shawn Vestal: Ryan Crocker offers withering critique of U.S. involvement in Iraq, Afghanistan

Spokane native and retired diplomat Ryan Crocker’s sobering interview on our efforts at rebuilding Afghanistan and Iraq is that they were poorly planned, haphazardly initiated and practically unsuccessful, and they fostered massive corruption in an impoverished country that was simply not structurally prepared to handle billions of dollars in U.S. aid.

U.S. officials reveal how massive rebuilding projects in Afghanistan backfired

George W. Bush, Barack Obama and Donald Trump all promised the same thing: The United States would not get stuck with the burden of "nation-building" in Afghanistan. Yet nation-building is exactly what the United States has tried to do in war-battered Afghanistan - on a colossal scale. Since 2001, Washington has spent more on nation-building in Afghanistan than in any country ever, allocating $133 billion for reconstruction, aid programs and the Afghan security forces. Adjusted for inflation, that is more than the United States spent in Western Europe with the Marshall Plan after World War II.

U.S. officials failed to devise a clear strategy for the war in Afghanistan, confidential documents show

In the beginning, the rationale for invading Afghanistan was clear: to destroy al-Qaida, topple the Taliban and prevent a repeat of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Within six months, the United States had largely accomplished what it set out to do. But then the U.S. government committed a fundamental mistake it would repeat again and again over the next 17 years, according to a cache of government documents obtained by the Washington Post.

US’s Afghan peace envoy makes surprise stop in Kabul

Washington’s special peace envoy Zalmay Khalilzad was in the Afghan capital Kabul on Wednesday to launch an “accelerated effort” to get Afghans on both sides of the protracted conflict to the negotiation table to plot a roadmap to a post-war Afghanistan.

U.S., Australian hostages freed by Taliban in prisoner swap

The Taliban on Tuesday freed an American and an Australian held hostage since 2016 in exchange for three top Taliban figures – a move that the insurgent group asserted could help rekindle talks to end Afghanistan’s 18-year war.

Afghan president: 3 Taliban released for held US, Australian

Afghan President Ashraf Ghani on Tuesday announced that his government has released three prominent Taliban figures in an effort to get the insurgents to free two university professors – an American and an Australian – they abducted three years ago.

U.S. has begun reducing troops in Afghanistan, commander says

The United States has reduced its troop strength in Afghanistan over the past year, the commander of American and NATO forces in Afghanistan announced Monday, despite the abrupt end last month of peace talks with the Taliban that centered on a draw-down of American troops.