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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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CDC identified 2 small Montana counties as being at risk for HIV

Of all the counties between Puget Sound and the Great Lakes, just two pop up on a U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention map as among the nation’s most at-risk for HIV. Mineral County, Montana (population 4,200) ranks 161st of 220 in the study. Treasure County, Montana (population 700) is 211th.

CDC gets list of forbidden words: fetus, transgender, diversity

Trump administration officials are forbidding officials at the nation’s top public health agency from using a list of seven words or phrases – including “fetus” and “transgender” – in any official documents being prepared for next year’s budget.

CDC Director: U.S. Zika fight is ‘essentually out of money’

WASHINGTON – The head of the government’s fight against the Zika virus said that “we are now essentially out of money” and warned that the country is “about to see a bunch of kids born with microcephaly” in the coming months. Friday’s warning from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Thomas Frieden came as lawmakers start to sort out a stopgap government funding bill that is being targeted to also carry long-delayed money to battle Zika.

Doctors urge flu shots, not nasal spray, this year

Kids may get more of a sting from flu vaccination this fall: Doctors are gearing up to give shots only, because U.S. health officials say the easy-to-use nasal spray version of the vaccine isn’t working as well as a jab.

Editorial: Kids today are more cautious

The CDC survey serves as a reminder that today’s youngsters do not necessarily embrace the coarsening that is evident in popular culture.

CDC: Idaho leads nation in melanoma death rate

Idaho had the highest melanoma death rate nationally between 2001 and 2005, 26 percent higher than the national average with about 40 Idahoans dying of melanoma every year, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s skin cancer state statistics. The latest statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (www.cdc.gov/cancer/ skin/statistics/state.htm) show that in 2012, Idahoans developed melanoma at a rate of 26.9 per 100,000 each year.