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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Transgender bathroom ban heard by federal appeals court

A Virginia school board defended its transgender bathroom ban before a federal appeals court Tuesday, as a transgender man who was barred as a student from using the boys’ bathrooms at his high school argued that the policy discriminated against him and violated his constitutional rights.

Justices rule for federal employee over age discrimination

The Supreme Court made it easier Monday for federal employees 40 and older to sue for age discrimination. The justices ruled 8-1 that federal workers have a lower hurdle to overcome than their counterparts in the private sector.

Federal, state courts ordered to halt in-person hearings through at least mid-April

The order from U.S. District Court Chief Judge Thomas O. Rice affects grand jury proceedings, civil and criminal cases, as well as naturalization ceremonies. At least one federal public defender in the region said the move could jeopardize the health of some criminal defendants imprisoned and awaiting trial or sentencing.

Ex-Guantanamo commander convicted of lying about man’s death

A former commander of the U.S. Navy base at Guantanamo Bay was convicted Friday of interfering with an investigation into the death of a civilian with whom the commander had fought and argued over his alleged affair with the man’s wife.

Roger Stone trial set to start Tuesday

Roger Stone heads to trial this week in federal court, where prosecutors plan to dive back into an episode of political chicanery, alleged lies and conspiratorial texts that parallels the nascent impeachment inquiry into his longtime friend President Donald Trump.

Ties to marijuana businesses are disqualifying bankruptcy filers, including City Councilwoman Karen Stratton

The U.S. Trustee Program, responsible for policing the federal courts’ bankruptcy proceedings, is weeding out cases involving people or firms with ties to state-sanctioned marijuana businesses. Earlier this summer, that included Karen Stratton and her husband, Chris Wright, despite the fact that the majority of their debts were not wrapped up in the family-owned farm they’ve helped operate since 2014.

Federal court can enforce tribal court rulings, 9th Circuit rules

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals says Native American tribal courts can ask the federal courts to enforce rulings against nontribal members. Boise State Public Radio reports the ruling from the appellate court last week reversed an opinion from a federal judge in Idaho.