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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Cabernet sauvignon thrives in Washington

It can now be argued that Washington’s signature wine is cabernet sauvignon, the grape that attracts wine lovers from all corners of the globe to Napa Valley and France’s Bordeaux region. Cab, known as “King Cab” to winemakers, is Washington’s most planted, most expensive and most famous variety.

Great Northwest Wine: Merlot still plays a big role in Washington

As recently as a decade ago, merlot still ruled in Washington vineyards. In 2009, merlot was the state’s No. 1 grape at 26,700 tons harvested that fall. In fact, merlot was the grape and the wine that helped put Washington on the world stage. The red variety from France’s Bordeaux region and the round, supple resulting wines brought Washington a measure of fame.

Northwest Wine: Dry rieslings can make astonishing wines

A decade ago, many Northwest rieslings would be on the sweet side. Thankfully, that is changing, blissfully so because more than any other wine, riesling can show astonishing range depending on where the grapes are grown and how dry the finished wine is left. As a bonus, one that surprises most, riesling can age remarkably – for those who have the patience to tuck them away.

Northwest Wine: Riesling is the perfect Pacific Northwest wine

Riesling, the noble grape of Germany, might be the quintessential Pacific Northwest wine. It is crafted in a broad range of styles, from bone dry to sweet nectar, and the resulting wines pair deliciously well with Northwest cuisine, particularly seafood and Asian-influenced dishes.

Northwest Wine: Horse Heaven Hills is home to stellar wines

Horse Heaven Hills spans more than 570,000 acres, all of which are in the vast Columbia Valley. This area north of the Columbia River and primarily south of Yakima Valley has been well known for agriculture, particularly wheat, carrots, potatoes and other row crops.

Northwest Wine: Double gold indicates extra-special bottle

A double gold medal indicates that a wine earned a gold medal by unanimous vote, meaning every judge on a panel awarded it a gold medal. At a wine competition, a panel typically consists of three to five judges. Getting that many wine professionals to agree on something should be considered rare.

Northwest Wine: Riesling perfectly versatile for your holiday table

As we march toward Thanksgiving, it’s time to start gathering wines for the big feast. One bottle you should consider making room for is riesling. The reasons are many. Germany’s noble white grape is versatile and offers crowd-pleasing flavors. Many of examples come loaded with the acidity that will help it pair well with everything on your table. Washington and Oregon both do riesling particularly well, so it’s a good hometown choice.

Great Northwest Wine: Riesling still a force in Washington wines

Washington has long had a reputation for crafting world-class riesling, with the first plantings as early as 1880, pre-dating statehood. Today, riesling remains a force in Washington, being the No. 4 grape, trailing cabernet sauvignon, merlot and chardonnay in total tonnage harvested.

Northwest Wine: Syrah continues to grow in popularity

Across America, syrah is a tough sale, thanks primarily to Australia shiraz flooding grocery stores in the past decade. Yet syrah continues to grow in Washington. Last fall, Washington winemakers brought in more than 21,000 tons of syrah, a record level for the state. Syrah certainly plays an important role in Washington red blends, but it stands alone pretty well, too.