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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Shawn Vestal: Safety upgrades for rail tank cars coming much too slowly

Something to consider about the 30,000-gallon tank cars full of Bakken crude oil that regularly pass through Spokane: The oil industry says the “arbitrary, capricious” federal government must give it more time to make the cars safer. The leaking tank cars in Mosier suggest otherwise.

Proposed oil terminal brings only risk for Spokane, critics say

Building a crude oil terminal in Vancouver, Washington, puts Spokane and other communities at risk from increased oil train traffic, without offering any local economic benefits, opponents of the project told state officials Thursday night.

Critics say oil trains report underestimates risk

The chance of an oil train derailing and dumping its cargo between Spokane and a new terminal proposed for Vancouver, Washington, is extremely low, according to a risk assessment prepared for state officials.

Plans for second rail bridge across Lake Pend Oreille put on hold

BNSF Railway Corp. has backed off from plans to build a second span over the water at Sandpoint, saying freight volume doesn’t justify the project at this time. The railroad last year said it wanted to add a second bridge across Lake Pend Oreille to relieve pressure on the original rail crossing, which is 110 years old, and absorb anticipated growth in rail traffic.

Forums will focus on upcoming decisions affecting oil train traffic

Laura Ackerman works at the Saranac Building in Spokane, a short walk from BNSF Railway’s train tracks. Oil trains pass her office on a daily basis, and more will roll through downtown if a new crude oil terminal is built 350 miles away in Vancouver, Washington.

Oil train safety bill signed into law

OLYMPIA – Gov. Jay Inslee signed into law Thursday a measure that attempts to improve the safety of oil transportation as a sharp increase in trains carrying volatile crude oil poses new safety and environmental risks in the state. A compromise reached on the last day of the regular legislative session resolved differences between competing bills in the Senate and House.

Gov. Inslee signs oil train measure

Gov. Jay Inslee signed into law a measure Thursday that attempts to improve the safety of oil transportation as a sharp increase in trains carrying volatile crude oil poses new safety and environmental risks in the state.