Arrow-right Camera

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
Clear Night 26° Clear

Tag search results

Tags let us describe our content with keywords, making it easier to find what you're most interested in. Use the search box to look for tags, or explore our coverage with the lists below.

Then and now: Consolidated Freight Lines

Leland James, a Portland, Oregon, truck driver, built a trucking empire. He started by buying Portland-Spokane Auto Freight and a handful of other firms in 1929. He called his new company Consolidated Freight Lines. Around 1935, Consolidated built a new office and warehouse at 126 S. Sheridan St. in Spokane.

Then and Now: Sprouse Reitz Variety Stores

Starting around 1940, Sprouse Reitz variety stores began popping up around Spokane. For housewives, there were household and craft supplies. For kids, there was candy and small toys.

Then and Now: Cannon House

One of the grandest homes in the Rockwood National Register Historic District was erected for pioneer attorney Edward J. Cannon and his wife, Helen, in 1911. The brick home in the Colonial Revival style is part of Spokane’s most exclusive and historic neighborhoods.

Then and Now: Opportunity Township

Townships were a way for rural areas to have a local government of their own, outside of cities and outside of county government. In Washington, only Spokane and Whatcom counties allowed townships to form a local government and levy property taxes to support it. The state approved townships in 1908.

Then and Now: Looff Carrousel

The Looff Carrousel in Riverfront Park has its origins in the craftsmanship of Charles Looff, a German woodworker who emigrated to the United States in 1870.

Then and Now: Silver Loaf Baking Co.

Spokane was always a wheat town, anchored by its flouring mills, which supplied several large bakeries. One of the larger bakers was Silver Loaf Baking Company, which had a production plant on the north rim of the Spokane River gorge for almost 40 years.

Spokane historians to re-enact the city’s great 1889 fire, on Twitter

Then, as now, smoke hung in the pines overlooking the young pioneer town beside the Spokane Falls. Area forests were ablaze. People and horses trudged along the dusty streets in the heat of an August afternoon. Little did they imagine that the buildings they passed within hours would catch fire and collapse into 32 blocks of ruin. Friday, 128 years later, Spokane history lovers plan to re-enact the day their city burned to the ground.

Then and now: Water tank on east Ninth

In 1968, Glen Yake, who was Spokane’s city engineer from the 1950s to the 1980s, said: “Water is Spokane’s greatest asset.” He said that major urban areas that had seen rationing had enough water to pump but had inadequate storage reservoirs during low-water periods.

Then and now: Construction, redesign of Riverfront Park

In the early 1960s, business and city leaders believed that Spokane needed something to bring it out of its funk. The economy was stagnant. Railroads were still shipping, but passenger service had declined. The downtown seemed dingy and industrial. Culturally, Spokane seemed stuck in the past.

Then and now: Hutton Building

Fueled by a lucky stake in a productive silver mine, Levi “Al” Hutton and May Arkwright built the Hutton building in 1906.

Then and Now: Stevens Street Extension

Before the 1960s, Stevens Street only went up the South Hill to Seventh Avenue, blocked by the cliff above and the expansive estate of Daniel Corbin, which was purchased by the city park board in 1945. But as early as the 1930s, city officials had been researching another way up the hill to relieve congestion on Grand Boulevard.

Then and now: Spokane Amateur Athletic Club

Spokane was booming in the 1890s, the population was growing rapidly and clubs, lodges and fraternal organizations were bursting at the seams. The Spokane Amateur Athletic Club organized in 1891 with the boast that their facilities would offer not only the best billiards and bowling, but also gym facilities for fitness.

Then and now: Avista Stadium

Baseball has been a staple of summer entertainment in Spokane since the 1890s. Spokane baseball teams carried names like the Hawks, Bunchgrassers, Blue Stockings and Smoke Eaters. But in 1940, the name Indians, used in the aughts and teens, returned to stay.

Then and now: Pratt Furniture

Entrepreneur Albert R. Pratt built a legacy in furniture in Spokane, in an area now incorporated into the River Park Square development.

Then and Now: Manito’s Duncan Garden

In early Spokane, parks were primarily natural spaces used for picnics. When Parks Superintendent John W. Duncan retired in 1942, Spokane’s park system included more parks, plus features like playgrounds, swimming pools, golf courses and sports courts and fields. Duncan was born in Aberdeen, Scotland, and came to the United States as a boy. He studied park management and worked in Boston. He passed through Spokane in 1909 on his way to a convention in Seattle and returned the next year to become the city’s park superintendent.

Then and Now: The Powell-Sanders Building

Edward L. Powell was 11 years old when his family moved west by covered wagon from Ohio to Oregon in 1862. After studying civil engineering, he worked for the railroad. But his health was poor and he couldn’t keep up with the railroad life. So he went to teach school in Walla Walla, then operate a general store in Waitsburg for 18 years.