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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Donna Kulibert makes functional pottery that creates connections

Donna Kulibert hopes that her chosen form of art might serve as an aid for others to live in the moment, if only for a moment. Her work is functional, and she is driven by the knowledge that, as someone holds one of her ceramic mugs, there is a sort of connection being made.

The Verve: Krysten Parmley finds making art a creative way to cope

Krystn Parmley is following her bliss. “If I didn’t make art I think I could be a very dysfunctional person. I create because I have to. This is my escape, my way of dealing with things,” she said. “I had thought about doing graphic design but I realized that I need to physically touch the mediums, get my hands dirty, feel the energy from my body, my hands, my fingers, transferring to the canvas or piece of paper, bringing this idea or feeling alive in a sense.”

The Verve: Spokane Film Project works to put city on the map

On this particular Sunday evening at O’Doherty’s Irish Grille, they push small tables together to form a large conference table to accommodate their group. There are about 20 of them, ranging in age from 17 to 40-something, and they all have stories to tell. They banter a bit and laugh a lot.

The Verve: Randi Harris gives organic nature back to man-made items

Randi Harris, 29, grew up in Emporia, Kan., and was heavily involved in art in high school, though she never thought of it as a potential career. She went on to receive a computer programming degree from Kansas State University and she worked odd jobs while doing art on the side. While living in Joplin, Mo., and studying art education, a catastrophic event had her rethinking her life.

The Verve: Randi Harris gives organic nature back to man-made items

Randi Harris, 29, grew up in Emporia, Kan., and was heavily involved in art in high school, though she never thought of it as a potential career. She went on to receive a computer programming degree from Kansas State University and she worked odd jobs while doing art on the side. While living in Joplin, Mo., and studying art education, a catastrophic event had her rethinking her life.

The Verve: Webbers’ artwork often goes against the grain

There are females and males, exposed. There are branches and leaves, wings, skulls, bones, guns and dark images mixed with light. It is all the world has to offer, unfiltered and exaggerated with hints of sarcasm. Not meant to be taken literally, the works are the extensions of artists Troy and Susan Webber, whose philosophies are to go against the grain, to not live life in fear, and to maintain their individuality in a world where so many refuse to stray from the paved path.

The Verve: Webbers’ art work often goes against the grain

There are females and males, exposed. There are branches and leaves, wings, skulls, bones, guns and dark images mixed with light. It is all the world has to offer, unfiltered and exaggerated with hints of sarcasm. Not meant to be taken literally, the works are the extensions of artists Troy and Susan Webber, whose philosophies are to go against the grain, to not live life in fear, and to maintain their individuality in a world where so many refuse to stray from the paved path.

The Verve: Josh Gillen’s mind keeps evolving

In November 2012, as Josh Gillen’s life was spiraling out of control, he looked up and asked for a sign. Not long after, he felt wrong and went to the hospital. He doesn’t remember a lot.

The Verve: Josh Gillen’s mind keeps evolving

In November 2012, as Josh Gillen’s life was spiraling out of control, he looked up and asked for a sign. Not long after, he felt wrong and went to the hospital. He doesn’t remember a lot.

The Verve: Tom Norton hopes to inspire others to create

Tom Norton grew up in Spokane. At Gonzaga Prep, while the priests gave their lessons, Norton would draw figures with eyes widely spaced; a subtle representation of vulnerability like animals of prey. Now, many years later, his subjects still exude a kind of meekness, and yet they are strong and carrying on.

Verve: Tom Norton hopes to inspire others to create

Tom Norton grew up in Spokane. At Gonzaga Prep, while the priests gave their lessons, Norton would draw figures with eyes widely spaced; a subtle representation of vulnerability like animals of prey. Now, many years later, his subjects still exude a kind of meekness, and yet they are strong and carrying on.

Lynne Blackwood’s pizzazz fuels her creativity

While planning her second wedding about 19 months ago, Lynne Blackwood found that the wedding dresses she was looking at lacked the pizzazz she desired and so, she fixed that. “Fixing ugly or out-of-date is very easy,” she said.

Spokane artist Valerie Woelk releases ‘Expressive Faces’ exhibit

Valerie Woelk has always made things; she’s been drawing and coloring as long as she can remember. She also used tools at hand, including a hammer and nails at her father’s and grandfather’s contracting business jobsites. “My job was to straighten the nails. They gave me scrap lumber to hammer little dots on with the nail head and make drawings with,” she recalled. “I spent hours drawing with my hammer, tapping to show them a dog, horse, flower or sun while we loaded up at the end of the day.”

Valerie Woelk, Spokane artist, releases ‘Expressive Faces’ exhibit

Valerie Woelk has always made things; she’s been drawing and coloring as long as she can remember. She also used tools at hand, including a hammer and nails at her father’s and grandfather’s contracting business jobsites. “My job was to straighten the nails. They gave me scrap lumber to hammer little dots on with the nail head and make drawings with,” she recalled. “I spent hours drawing with my hammer, tapping to show them a dog, horse, flower or sun while we loaded up at the end of the day.”

The Verve: Freuen mixes forms, utilizing clay and drawing

In a large detached studio on her property near the Little Spokane River, Gina Freuen contemplates the past, the present and the future – all coming together using a pencil, carving tools and chunks of clay. She shares her findings and tells her stories through her finished products, sculpturally and narratively driven vessels and teapots. Known for her teapots, Freuen describes the form as figurative and ceremonial.

The Verve: Art a ‘lifelong friend,’ artist says

As a child, Erica Horton made art like most children do – as a form of play or a means to express things children have no words for. Pablo Picasso once said, “Every child is an artist, the problem is how to remain an artist once we grow up.”

The Verve: Spokane good fit for artist to ply her craft

Linda Malcom is a historian of sorts – a memory keeper who fills journals with a mix of words and images that are more universal than they are personal. Page after page is filled with motivational and inspirational quotes seemingly being spoken by whimsical and magical figures – human, animals or a mix of both. They are finely crafted doodles; a habit that Malcom mastered through years of practice and study, fueled by an innate desire to express herself creatively.

Amy Galbavy’s mosaic touch transforms stone and concrete

Amy Galbavy spent many years in business attire as a biotech pharmaceutical representative. When her daughter Berlin was born six years ago, Galbavy decided to become a stay-at-home mom. One day, while playing cards at a large round table with her grandmother, Galbavy realized that their game would go much more smoothly with a Lazy Susan. So, she made one. On her website, she explained, “my grandmother had difficulty reaching the cards across the table. The next week I surprised her with a giant Lazy Susan covered with an underwater scene mosaic using stained glass, stone and marble. When it’s not being used for card games or food serving, it reflects the light beaming through my kitchen windows and decorates the room. Family, neighbors and friends began to ask how much I sold them for. This planted a seed.”

ART OF GLASS

Amy Galbavy spent many years in business attire as a biotech pharmaceutical representative. When her daughter Berlin was born six years ago, Galbavy decided to become a stay-at-home mom. One day, while playing cards at a large round table with her grandmother, Galbavy realized that their game would go much more smoothly with a Lazy Susan. So, she made one. On her website, she explained, “my grandmother had difficulty reaching the cards across the table. The next week I surprised her with a giant Lazy Susan covered with an underwater scene mosaic using stained glass, stone and marble. When it’s not being used for card games or food serving, it reflects the light beaming through my kitchen windows and decorates the room. Family, neighbors and friends began to ask how much I sold them for. This planted a seed.”