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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Drugs to reduce breast cancer risk available but not widely used

Two well-established drugs can do for breast cancer what statins and blood pressure drugs do for heart attacks and strokes: drive down its odds of happening. But while cardiovascular medications are aggressively advertised, widely prescribed and talked about freely among friends and co-workers, breast cancer prevention drugs are virtually invisible on the American pharmaceutical landscape.

Homegrown fundraising harnesses power of pink

Ten-year-old Parker Salinas considers herself one lucky little girl and a lifelong believer in the power of pink. Mom Jules was diagnosed two years ago with breast cancer, enduring weeks of radiation, chemotherapy and, finally, a double mastectomy that saved her life.

Law will give boost to breast cancer awareness

Breast cancer is extremely rare in young women. But when it does happen, it can be serious, even deadly. A little-noticed section in the federal health-care overhaul aims to raise awareness among young women and their doctors about the risk of breast cancer between the ages of 15 and 44.

Compromise reached in bracelet brouhaha

A Riverside High School student can wear his "I Love Boobies!" bracelet to school to support breast cancer research, as long as it's turned inside out, according to the student's mother. Lisa Jewell said today that her son, 16-year-old sophomore Dakota Jewell, reached that compromise with school administrators after being suspended from school on Thursday and Friday last week.

‘Boobies’ slogan causes stir at Riverside High

A Riverside High School student sat outside the administration office Friday waiting for her turn to talk to the principal about a slogan that caused a stir at the school all week. As she waited, she wrote “I Love Boobies!” on her arm, adding it those already written in multiple colors. Meanwhile, a fellow student sat in the principal’s office being reprimanded for sporting that same slogan.

Cancer survivor runs for her life

When it comes to life’s challenges, North Side resident Carol Dellinger approaches them like a marathon, with optimism, determination and strength. Known as the marathon machine or marathon warrior, Dellinger runs a marathon every two to three weeks and only two women in the United States have run more of them. She finished No. 237, the Capital City Marathon in Olympia, on May 16.

Study backs 2 drugs in breast cancer fight

Older women at higher risk for breast cancer now have two good drug options for preventing the disease, but they will have to weigh the trade-offs, a major study shows. Tamoxifen, the longtime gold standard, is more effective and longer lasting, the results show. But a newer drug – raloxifene, sold as Evista – is safer.

Pink to reign as Race for the Cure continues cancer fight

Some days the drugs she takes to treat her stage one breast cancer keep Heather McDonnell in bed. But on Saturday, the 32-year-old Spokane woman felt strong enough for an outing to the 2010 Spokane Women’s Show at the Spokane Convention Center.

Survivors, supporters get ready to race for the cure

Some days the drugs she takes to treat her stage one breast cancer keep Heather McDonnell in bed. But on Saturday, the 32-year-old Spokane woman felt strong enough for an outing to the 2010 Spokane Women’s Show at the Spokane Convention Center.

Study: Aspirin may cut breast cancer recurrence

LOS ANGELES – Women who take aspirin regularly after their breast cancer goes into remission are about 50 percent less likely to suffer a recurrence or to die from the disease, according to new findings from the ongoing Nurses’ Health Study. The results, reported Tuesday in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, are surprising because at least five large studies have shown that taking aspirin regularly has no effect on the risk of developing breast cancer in the first place. The study’s authors described the findings as surprising and worthy of follow-up, but even they cautioned that survivors shouldn’t yet begin prophylactic aspirin use.

Bone drugs may aid breast cancer fight

SAN ANTONIO – New results from a landmark women’s health study raise the possibility that bone-building drugs such as Fosamax and Actonel may help prevent breast cancer. Women who already were using these medicines when the study began were about one-third less likely to develop invasive breast cancer over the next seven years than women not taking such pills, doctors reported Thursday.