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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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7 scientists win prestigious Lasker medical awards

NEW YORK (AP) — Seven scientists have won prestigious medical awards for development of liver transplantation, discoveries about the inner workings of cells, and leadership in biomedical science. The Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation announced the winners Monday. The prizes, worth $250,000 for each of three categories, will be presented in New York on Sept. 21.

AP IMPACT: Surprising methods heal wounded troops

BOSTON (AP) — Scientists are growing ears, bone and skin in the lab, and doctors are planning more face transplants and other extreme plastic surgeries. Around the country, the most advanced medical tools that exist are now being deployed to help America's newest veterans and wounded troops. —In Los Angeles, surgeons used part of Michael Mills' forehead to rebuild his nose after a bomb disfigured him in Iraq.

Surprising new medicine to heal wounded warriors

BOSTON (AP) — Scientists are growing ears, bone and skin in the lab, and doctors are planning more face transplants and other extreme plastic surgeries. Around the country, the most advanced medical tools that exist are now being deployed to help America's newest veterans and wounded troops. —In Los Angeles, surgeons used part of Michael Mills' forehead to rebuild his nose after a bomb disfigured him in Iraq.

AP IMPACT: Surprising methods heal wounded troops

BOSTON (AP) — Scientists are growing ears, bone and skin in the lab, and doctors are planning more face transplants and other extreme plastic surgeries. Around the country, the most advanced medical tools that exist are now being deployed to help America's newest veterans and wounded troops. —In Los Angeles, surgeons used part of Michael Mills' forehead to rebuild his nose after a bomb disfigured him in Iraq.

Ryan: Don’t interfere with legalized medical pot

DENVER (AP) — Republican vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan says the federal government shouldn't interfere with states that have legalized medical marijuana. The Wisconsin congressman tells KRDO-TV in Colorado Springs that he personally doesn't approve of medical marijuana laws. But he says that states should have the right to choose whether to legalize the drug for medical purposes.

Aide: Rep. Jackson home after depression treatment

CHICAGO (AP) — U.S. Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. has returned to his home in Washington after treatment for depression at Mayo Clinic, Jackson's chief of staff in suburban Chicago said Friday. "He's at home in Washington convalescing with his wife and children," Jackson aide Rick Bryant said. "Let's hope he returns to work on Monday."

Zimbabwe AIDS activist sues prisons over drugs

HARARE, Zimbabwe (AP) — An AIDS awareness campaigner is pressing Zimbabwe's highest court to force police and prison authorities ensure HIV sufferers receive life prolonging medication. Douglas Muzanenhamo said in papers filed at the Supreme Court that he was denied appropriate antiretroviral treatment in jail for three weeks last year and his condition veered toward death.

Radiation may up breast cancer risk in some women

LONDON (AP) — Mammograms aimed at finding breast cancer might actually raise the chances of developing it in young women whose genes put them at higher risk for the disease, a study by leading European cancer agencies suggests. The added radiation from mammograms and other types of tests with chest radiation might be especially harmful to them and an MRI is probably a safer method of screening women under 30 who are at high risk because of gene mutations, the authors conclude.

British health chief dubbed “minister for magic”

LONDON (AP) — He supports homeopathy, a practice that many experts liken to snake oil. He opposes late-term abortion, falling afoul of this mostly pro-choice nation. During the London Olympics, he offended many Britons with a jab at the cherished National Health Service. This is Jeremy Hunt — Britain's new health minister. He's only been in his job since Tuesday, but already some experts fret that his controversial views and general knack for inviting scandal could sow confusion in an already fragile health system.

Agent Orange victims get Scientology ‘detox’

HANOI, Vietnam (AP) — Vietnamese with ailments linked to Agent Orange are undergoing a "detoxification" treatment involving saunas and vitamins that was developed by the Church of Scientology and which has been criticized as pseudoscientific. Scientologists use the "Hubbard Method" to try to cure drug addiction and alcoholism. The church set up a center in New York after the 9/11 attacks offering a similar service for first responders who may have been exposed to toxins.

Some notable rulings on transgender people

Some court rulings in recent years on transgender people's access to gender-related medical care: — In 2010, the U.S. Tax Court found that the costs of female hormones and sex-reassignment surgery were deductible as medical expenses in the case of a Massachusetts woman. Rhiannon O'Donnabhain, who was born a man, sued the Internal Revenue Service in 2007 after the agency rejected a $5,000 deduction for about $25,000 in medical expenses associated with the surgery, finding it was a cosmetic procedure and not medically necessary. The Tax Court found that O'Donnabhain should have been allowed to deduct the costs of her treatment for gender-identity disorder.

Some notable rulings on transgender people

Some court rulings in recent years on transgender people's access to gender-related medical care: — In 2010, the U.S. Tax Court found that the costs of female hormones and sex-reassignment surgery were deductible as medical expenses in the case of a Massachusetts woman. Rhiannon O'Donnabhain, who was born a man, sued the Internal Revenue Service in 2007 after the agency rejected a $5,000 deduction for about $25,000 in medical expenses associated with the surgery, finding it was a cosmetic procedure and not medically necessary. The Tax Court found that O'Donnabhain should have been allowed to deduct the costs of her treatment for gender-identity disorder.

Author Judy Blume diagnosed with breast cancer

NEW YORK (AP) — Children's author Judy Blume says she was diagnosed with breast cancer over the summer but is "feeling stronger every day" after surgery. The 74-year-old Blume wrote on her blog Wednesday that she learned in June that she had cancer and underwent a mastectomy and reconstruction in late July. She writes that she now walks a couple of miles each morning and dines out at night. Blume hopes to begin writing again soon.

News Summary: Pfizer gets OK for leukemia drug

WASHINGTON (AP) — FDA APPROVAL: The Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday approved a new drug from Pfizer for treating a rare form of blood and bone-marrow cancer. BAD BLOOD CELLS: Pfizer's Bosulif is a daily pill to treat chronic myeloid leukemia, a disease that causes the bone marrow to produce unhealthy white blood cells. White blood cells are needed to help the body fight off infection.

FDA approves Pfizer drug for rare blood cancer

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday approved a new Pfizer drug to treat a rare form of blood and bone marrow cancer that causes a buildup of unhealthy white blood cells. Pfizer's Bosulif is a daily pill to treat chronic myeloid leukemia patients who carry a specific genetic variation. The disease is one of four types of the blood cancer, and accounts for about 15 percent of leukemia cases.

Refunds on way to cover CVS business’ price error

NEW YORK (AP) — The Federal Trade Commission said that it is mailing refund checks to 13,000 Medicare Part D beneficiaries who were overcharged for drugs because a CVS Caremark Corp. business understated the price of the medications. The FTC says its redress administrator Rust Consulting Inc. began mailing the checks Tuesday. The checks are valid for 60 days from the date they were issued and they must be cashed within that time.

Study questions how much better organic food is

WASHINGTON (AP) — Patient after patient asked: Is eating organic food, which costs more, really better for me? Unsure, Stanford University doctors dug through reams of research to find out — and concluded there's little evidence that going organic is much healthier, citing only a few differences involving pesticides and antibiotics.

Ukrainian orphan treated for severe burns in Mass.

BOSTON (AP) — Not much is known about how Ihor Lakatosh ended up with burns over 30 percent of his body. The little Ukrainian boy was severely malnourished and unable to walk or bend his arms when neighbors in Lviv, Ukraine, urged his mother to take him to a hospital about a year ago. She did, and never came back.

Study questions how much better organic food is

WASHINGTON (AP) — Patient after patient asked: Is eating organic food, which costs more, really better for me? Unsure, Stanford University doctors dug through reams of research to find out — and concluded there's little evidence that going organic is much healthier, citing only a few differences involving pesticides and antibiotics.