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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Spokane NAACP president Phillip Tyler says he’s sorry for deaths of black men and police officers

When Spokane NAACP president Phillip Tyler watched a video of Baton Rouge police officers fatally shooting Alton Sterling, he knew he had to say something. Tyler, a former deputy with the Spokane County Sheriff’s Office, said his immediate response after watching the video was pain and anger. Many community members were texting him to share their own anger and pain. So Tyler decided to make a video.

Phillip Tyler video

Spokane NAACP president Phillip Tyler responds after watching a video of Baton Rouge police officers fatally shooting Alton Sterling.

Shawn Vestal: Act against hate; Spokane deserves it

If you think the NAACP is an important organization with a vital mission, now would be an excellent time to show it. If you think that the city’s ombudsman commission and oversight of the police department is a crucial enterprise, now would be an excellent time to show it.

Spokane NAACP moves forward after Rachel Dolezal controversy

There was a sense of hope, tinged with wariness, at the first Spokane NAACP community meeting since the national furor over former chapter president Rachel Dolezal’s lies about her race. “We recognize that relationships have been disrupted. We recognize that there has been hurt and distrust,” said Naima Quarles-Burnley, the chapter’s new president. “(But) the actions of one person cannot, and should not, derail a 95-year legacy that the Spokane NAACP has had.”

New NAACP president: Dolezal’s actions shouldn’t derail group’s mission

Naima Quarles-Burnley, the new president of the Spokane NAACP chapter, acknowledged Friday that the community is hurt and angry about the actions of the chapter’s former president, Rachel Dolezal. Dolezal resigned as president and was removed from Spokane’s Police Ombudsman Commission this week after it became known that she had been lying about her race for years by pretending to be black.

Local NAACP to host community meeting

Naima Quarles-Burnley, the new president of the Spokane NAACP Chapter, acknowledged Friday that the community is hurt and angry about the actions of the chapter’s former president, Rachel Dolezal. Dolezal resigned as president and was taken off the Police Ombudsman Commission this week after it became known that she had been lying about her race for years by pretending to be black. “We cannot allow the actions of one individual to derail the work of many,” Quarles-Burnley said.

Spokane Council removes Rachel Dolezal from police panel

Embattled civil rights activist Rachel Dolezal lost another local leadership role Thursday. Spokane City Council members removed her from the fledgling Police Ombudsman Commission following an internal investigation into misconduct that targeted three commissioners. One of the other volunteer commissioners investigated, Kevin Berkompas, submitted his resignation, while the third, Adrian Dominguez, will be given a chance to respond to the investigative findings next week before the council decides whether to remove him. “I just hope we are all able to move forward quickly,” said Council President Ben Stuckart

SR gets letter from writer who threatened Dolezal

Another letter that appears to be authored by the same person who sent a packet of threatening photos and racial rants to Rachel Dolezal earlier this year has been received by The Spokesman-Review. The letter was mailed from Oakland, California, and date-stamped June 15. The letter – sent to “All NAACP Branches” – is a rambling note that criticizes the civil rights organization and Dolezal, who resigned last week from her post as president of the Spokane NAACP.

Spokesman-Review gets letter from writer who threatened Dolezal

Another letter that appears to be authored by the same person who sent a packet of threatening photos and racial rants to Rachel Dolezal earlier this year has been received by The Spokesman-Review. The letter was mailed from Oakland, California, and date-stamped June 15. The letter – sent to “All NAACP Branches” – is a rambling note that criticizes the civil rights organization and Dolezal, who resigned last week from her post as president of the Spokane NAACP.

Dolezal visited city where hate mail was postmarked

When asked about the 'hate mail' sent from Oakland during the KXLY interview, Dolezal said, "...Two pieces of mail from Oakland and one piece of mail that got dropped off at the post office. Again, it seems highly unlikely that an individual that had a key could have been in two places at once or would have flown to Oakland to mail those last two pieces. I think that's kind of reaching." Today the Cda Press reports Dolezal was in Oakland just days before that threatening mail was received.

Clark: Rachel Dolezal mess taints Police Ombudsman Commission

So here we are, less than a year away from the 10th anniversary of that March day when a citizen died because he went into a convenience store for some diet soda and a Snickers bar. And one of the only real positives that came out of Otto Zehm’s ultimately fatal encounter with an abusive Spokane cop – the Office of Police Ombudsman Commission – is now awash in scandal.

Three members of police oversight panel, including Rachel Dolezal, asked to resign

Spokane’s independent police oversight panel is in turmoil. Three of its five members, including former Spokane NAACP president Rachel Dolezal, likely will be removed by the City Council if they don’t immediately resign following an investigation that found multiple instances of misconduct including records tampering, disclosure of sensitive information, demeaning treatment of city employees and attempted overstepping of their authority.

Vestal: As Dolezal played her game, many of us played along

At the end of February, I saw a social media post about a package of racist, seemingly threatening letters that the head of Spokane’s NAACP chapter said she had received. I reached out to Rachel Dolezal, and she agreed to an interview at her home. I asked her about the 20-page package – which included gun-range target imagery and a photo of a lynching – and looked at cellphone photographs of the materials, which had been turned over to police.