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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Concert celebrates life, supports family of local DJ Mundell

Dustin Mundell had many friends. His affable nature ensured it. Those friends are mourning his death three weeks ago in a car accident in North Idaho. Mundell, who worked his way up from DJ at the Knitting Factory to assistant general manager – a post he held for five years – will be celebrated tonight with a concert featuring Spokane bluesman Sammy Eubanks and friends.

Concert celebrates life, supports family of local DJ Mundell

Dustin Mundell had many friends. His affable nature ensured it. Those friends are mourning his death three weeks ago in a car accident in North Idaho. Mundell, who worked his way up from DJ at the Knitting Factory to assistant general manager – a post he held for five years – will be celebrated tonight with a concert featuring Spokane bluesman Sammy Eubanks and friends.

Matt Nathanson at Knitting Factory

Folk rocker Matt Nathanson, the man behind the platinum-selling hit “Come On Get Higher” – one of the great earworms from the 2000s (“So come on get higher/ loosen my lips / faith and desire and the swing of your hips / just pull me down hard / and drown me in love”) – is touring in support of his new album, “Last of the Great Pretenders.” With special guest Joshua Radin. When: Tuesday, 7:30 p.m.

Son Volt settles into a sound

Jay Farrar has found himself looking backward. Or perhaps “listening” backward is a better way to put it. Farrar, the driving force behind the alt-county/traditional American music band Son Volt, had been listening to a lot of country music from the late 1950s and early ’60s that emanated from Bakersfield, Calif. The so-called Bakersfield Sound, typified by artists such as Buck Owens, Wynn Stewart and Merle Haggard, differed from Nashville country of the time. The Bakersfield artists relied on pedal steel guitar and fiddle and borrowed from rock ’n roll, while their Nashville counterparts were into big orchestration, slick production and lots of strings.

Son Volt settles into a sound

Jay Farrar has found himself looking backward. Or perhaps “listening” backward is a better way to put it. Farrar, the driving force behind the alt-county/traditional American music band Son Volt, had been listening to a lot of country music from the late 1950s and early ’60s that emanated from Bakersfield, Calif. The so-called Bakersfield Sound, typified by artists such as Buck Owens, Wynn Stewart and Merle Haggard, differed from Nashville country of the time. The Bakersfield artists relied on pedal steel guitar and fiddle and borrowed from rock ’n roll, while their Nashville counterparts were into big orchestration, slick production and lots of strings.

MGMT show promises hint of anticipated third album

MGMT cast a spell on the indie world with the hypnotic hooks and catchy anthems of its 2007 major-label debut, “Oracular Spectacular.” The Grammy Award- winning “Electric Feel” and the Grammy-nominated “Kids” were omnipresent in every form of media involving music, most notably when the band sued the former president of France for using “Kids” without their permission while simultaneously pushing anti-piracy legislation.

MGMT show promises hint of anticipated third album

MGMT cast a spell on the indie world with the hypnotic hooks and catchy anthems of its 2007 major-label debut, “Oracular Spectacular.” The Grammy Award- winning “Electric Feel” and the Grammy-nominated “Kids” were omnipresent in every form of media involving music, most notably when the band sued the former president of France for using “Kids” without their permission while simultaneously pushing anti-piracy legislation.

Doug Clark: Spo-fight Club would draw crowds downtown

Figuring out how to lure more of the public downtown has been the curse of every civic booster since Expo ’74. Yet until now, nobody has been able to break through the firewall of excuses, such as …

Knitting Factory returns with Webby

It was music to the ears of concertgoers when the Knitting Factory announced last week that the police’s mandated shut down had been lifted. That means music fans won’t miss out on acts that might have skipped Spokane otherwise, such as Owl City, Josh Ritter and Saturday’s headliner, Chris Webby.

Knitting Factory concert hall back in business

The Knitting Factory concert hall is back in business. Spokane city officials lifted the entertainment license suspension after the concert hall’s management agreed to discuss changes that would help ensure the safety of its patrons.

City lifts ban on concerts at Knitting Factory

Spokane City officials today announced that they lifted the suspension of the entertainment license for the Knitting Factory after the concert hall’s management agreed to discuss changes that would help ensure the safety of its patrons.

Deal to reinstate Knitting Factory license may be near

Spokane officials could announce as early as this morning a decision to reinstate the entertainment license of the Knitting Factory after police Chief Frank Straub closed the downtown concert venue Monday following two gang-related shootings that occurred after a recent concert. Spokane City Attorney Nancy Isserlis said Straub and Knitting Factory CEO Greg Marchant have had “extraordinarily productive discussions” on increasing security at the venue.

Knitting Factory may open again this week

Spokane city officials could announce as early as this morning the decision to reinstate the business license of the Knitting Factory after Police Chief Frank Straub closed the downtown concert venue Monday following two gang-related shootings that occurred after a recent concert.

Spokane music venue punished following shootings

Owners of the Knitting Factory said they are working with police to fight gang violence in the wake of two shootings Monday. The gunfire prompted Spokane police Chief Frank Straub to suspend the popular concert venue’s entertainment license after several fights spilled into downtown streets in the past year.

Zion I, Sweatshop Union headline hip-hop shows

A pair of positively charged indie-hip-hop groups are coming through town this week in the form of Sweatshop Union and Zion I. Both are sticking to formula on their latest releases, upholding tradition but altering the chemistry of their signature styles.

Have blues, will travel

Area musician Sammy Eubanks has a chance to win big at the International Blues Challenge in Memphis this month and a few of his friends are pitching in to help him get there. The Washington Blues Society is hosting a benefit concert Sunday at the Knitting Factory to raise money for travel expenses for Eubanks and band members Jake Barr and Michael Hays. Doors will open at 4 p.m. with a concert and silent auction kicking off at 5 p.m. Admission is $10 at the door; advance tickets are available at www.ticketfly.com.

Hip-hop icon Snoop Dogg hits town Wednesday

Snoop Dogg, Snoop Doggy Dogg, Snoop Lion, the Doggfather, or just plain Snoop. Regardless of the alias he adopts, or how ridiculous they may seem, Snoop remains arguably one of the coolest cats, err, dogs, err, lions ... whatever. It doesn’t matter if he is fighting a real-life murder trial or haunting hoods in cheesy horror flicks, Snoop is the guy you call when it’s time to resurrect 2Pac as a hologram.

EOTO in step ‘electrogranically’

A shared passion for improvisation first brought them togehter. Then they crossed paths as bandmates in String Cheese Incident. Now, Jason Hann and Michael Travis are carving out their own niche as “electrorganic” dubstep dance duo EOTO, interweaving improvised live instrumentation for a unique experience night after night in their nonstop tour schedule. In this Q&A-style interview, Hann talks about the challenges of playing music styled after electronic genres using organic instruments, playing it live versus recording it for an album, and the elusive allure of dubstep. IJ: How did you and Michael Travis first get together?

To be blunt, Buddz’s sound creates buzz

Collie Buddz derived his name from a slang term for marijuana. But his blend of reggae is not only synonymous with “dope” meaning weed, but also “dope” meaning good.