Arrow-right Camera
The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
Partly Cloudy Day 22° Partly Cloudy

Tag search results

Tags let us describe our content with keywords, making it easier to find what you're most interested in. Use the search box to look for tags, or explore our coverage with the lists below.

Oregon approves new taxes to address rising Medicaid costs

Oregon approved taxes on hospitals, health insurers and managed care companies in an unusual special election Tuesday that asked voters – and not lawmakers – how to pay for soaring Medicaid costs that now include coverage of hundreds of thousands of low-income residents added to the program’s rolls under the Affordable Care Act.

Oregonians to vote on Medicaid taxes as costs soar

Oregon aggressively expanded its Medicaid rolls under the Affordable Care Act, adding enough people to leave only 5 percent of its population uninsured – one of America’s lowest rates. Now, with the reduction of a federal match that covered those enrollees, the state is calling on voters to decide how to pay for its ballooning Medicaid costs.

Sen. Maryanne Jordan files personal bill to expand Medicaid

Today, on the deadline for filing personal bills in the Senate, Sen. Maryanne Jordan, D-Boise, filed a Medicaid expansion bill. “I did it because we are going to have substantive discussions this year on health care, and I think it’s important to continue to measure...

Outside View: A solution in search of a problem

The following editorial appeared in Saturday’s Washington Post. In contrast with those of other advanced industrial democracies, especially in Europe, the U.S. system of social insurance and income support distributes benefits based not only on membership in society, but also on work effort, past and present. In the realm of health insurance, this means that instead of adopting universal coverage as a national legal standard, then devising a unitary system to meet that goal, the United States cobbled together programs whose organizing principle, such as it is, is work. A plurality of adults get tax-subsidized insurance through their employers; most retirees get Medicare, paid for out of deductions from their past paychecks. Many others – poor children, people with disabilities – obtain insurance from programs whose premise is that the recipients are neither expected nor able to work, which is itself a work-related criterion.

Kentucky is first to get OK for Medicaid work requirement

Kentucky has become the first state to require many of its Medicaid recipients to work to receive coverage, part of an unprecedented change to the nation’s largest health insurance program under the Trump administration.

Trump work requirement rewrites health care rules for poor

Rewriting the rules on health care for the poor, the Trump administration said Thursday it will allow states to require “able-bodied” Medicaid recipients to work, a hotly debated first in the program’s half-century history.

Goodman: Tax bill passes on darkest day

A country’s annual budget is often described as a moral document, defining the nation’s values. Its tax system codifies its fairness. Who pays into the system, and who reaps the rewards?

New Medicaid feature to reduce future nursing home enrollees

Years in the making, Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf’s administration is rolling out a new Medicaid feature that’s designed to reduce the future number of enrollees in nursing homes and, along with it, a fast-growing expense in a state where the elderly population is exploding.