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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Anti-meth group enlists art

Everyone has seen the billboards. One look and eyes quickly turn back to the road. They portray people whose appearances have deteriorated to the point of rotting teeth and discolored skin. That is exactly what the Idaho Meth Project has hoped to accomplish since launching its campaign two years ago. A nonprofit organization, the Idaho Meth Project is a prevention program whose goal is to prevent first-time meth use.

Two sought after Pend Oreille Co. meth lab busts

Two men are wanted after deputies found clandestine meth labs and stolen vehicles at a home in Pend Oreille County. Suspect Shad A. Johnson, 38, was already sought by authorities in Spokane County in connection with a separate drug case stemming from an arrest outside a Spokane developer’s home.

Developer’s case probed

A massive investigation into a suspected drug and stolen property ring has led to allegations of a methamphetamine- and sex-fueled criminal enterprise operated by a once-prominent Spokane land developer. The raid in January at Joseph G. Ward’s home along the shores of Long Lake, northwest of Spokane, sparked a months-long probe by a Washington State Patrol detective that explored an underworld of drugs, sex and thievery that documents suggest was a way of life for the millionaire.

Suspected meth lab catches fire

A rental home that neighbors said has been a source of problems for more than a decade burst into flames Friday night in the West Central neighborhood. Firefighters spotted items that caused crews to suspect the house may have been converted into a toxic meth lab.

Meth ring suspects face charges

A Kalispell man has admitted his role in what prosecutors say is a drug trafficking ring that funneled large amounts of methamphetamine from Spokane to northwestern Montana.

Meth survey says risks seem not to deter teens

BOISE – A new survey by the Idaho Meth Project shows that more state teens believe it’s risky to use methamphetamine than in 2007, but that belief doesn’t yet appear to be changing any behaviors. The Idaho Meth Project commissioned the survey to see if its gritty and graphic advertising campaign has been effective in warning youth away from methamphetamine. The questions were nearly identical to those in the 2007 survey, conducted just before the advertising campaign began.

Idaho Meth Project: Teens see greater drug risk

A new survey by the Idaho Meth Project shows that more teens believe it’s risky to use methamphetamine than in 2007, but that belief doesn’t yet appear to be changing any behaviors.

Realtor’s arrest highlights perils of meth

Joseph G. Ward earned a master’s degree in business from Gonzaga University, spent time as a heralded super stock race car driver and ascended to the top of the land-development industry, winning sales awards, buying acres of coveted land and doing business with real estate moguls Harlan Douglass and Raymond Hanson. But last week, investigators searching his Nine Mile Falls home found methamphetamine and property from several burglaries, and the owner of Pinnacle Realty spent the night in the Spokane County Jail on drug and stolen property charges.

Man sentenced for meth lab disposal

Robert Wayne Webb was sentenced to a year in prison for improperly storing hazardous waste from meth labs in Rathdrum, Idaho, and a Spokane home.

Idaho Meth Project spreads cautionary tales

Some teenagers in this rural North Idaho town want to know more about methamphetamine so they’re never tempted to use the highly addictive, easy-to-access drug. That’s the response the director of the Idaho Meth Project is hoping for – educating teens and young adults before they experiment with the drug.

Surge of anti-meth ads hints at what’s to come

Graphic anti-meth ads running on TV and in newspapers around the Inland Northwest are just a taste of what Idaho's in for next year. When the Idaho Meth Project kicks off – its goal is to start in January – the airwaves will be filled with images of blood, pale young people whose faces are riddled with sores, and in-your-face scenes of violence, car crashes, desperate teens and crime. All are designed to drive home one message, tailored for young people: Don't use meth, not even once.

Toxics found at house

Barrels of cyanide and other toxic chemicals were stored at the northwest Spokane home of a senior citizen – so many containers that her garage couldn't hold them all. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Washington Department of Ecology workers in hazardous waste suits cleaned up the toxic dump site Thursday and Friday.