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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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‘Good cops’ impress city critic

A fixture of Spokane City Council meetings and frequent critic of city government praised police officers Sunday afternoon after he was robbed and the suspects were apprehended. Hank Valder, who often testifies at the council’s Monday meetings, was attacked just outside the Divine’s 76 station at Second Avenue and Walnut Street about 2:10 p.m.

Sustainability plan gets cool acceptance

The Spokane City Council on Monday gave a lukewarm endorsement to ideas designed to help combat climate change. The council’s approval was so reluctant that it added an amendment to the document that stressed the action was only to “accept” the report, which was drafted by the 13-member Sustainability Task Force formed last year by Mayor Mary Verner.

Council to evaluate new bike plan

Many Spokane streets would have more room for bikes under a plan that soon will be considered by the Spokane City Council. “We talk about being more bike- and pedestrian-friendly as a community,” said Councilman Mike Allen. “This is really the first step if we’re going to be committed to it.”

Council to debate revised sign ordinance

Many Spokane business owners were outraged by the City Council’s attempt to adopt new sign rules two months ago, and their reaction has paid off.

Our View: City should have risked arbitration on chiefs’ pay

Old assumptions ought to be tested every so often to see if they’re still valid. Especially assumptions that keep us from acting prudently. At Spokane City Hall, for example, there seems to be an assumption that state law will let public safety unions get whatever they want in the collective bargaining process. This assumption stems from a bad experience that occurred more than 30 years ago but is cited every time city government negotiates a generous contract with its police officers or firefighters.

Fire chiefs to get raises despite layoff concerns

Spokane city fire battalion chiefs will get raises over the next four years, despite concerns by some City Council members that the economy is forcing taxpayers to take cuts or face layoffs. The Spokane City Council was told Monday that it had little choice but to give members of the Spokane Association of Fire Officers – the union that represents 10 battalion chiefs – raises negotiated in collective bargaining sessions. If the council refused, the city could be accused of bad-faith bargaining and facing binding arbitration, said Gita Hatcher, who represented the city in negotiations.

Council votes for a study of Y buy

The Spokane City Council wants to study whether buying the YMCA building in Riverfront Park with Conservation Futures funds is the “highest and best use” of that money for the community. But that doesn’t mean the city is walking away from the proposal. The council voted Monday night to order a study of the purchase, which is being proposed by Spokane County commissioners. If the study determines Conservation Futures restrictions make the plan to spend some $4.4 million of the funds a bad idea, the council is ready with backup plans, probably involving a loan from the city’s investment pool.

Council OKs batallion chief raises

Spokane city fire battalion chiefs will get raises over the next four years, despite concerns by some City Council members that the economy is forcing taxpayers to take cuts or face layoffs.

City wants to buy Y, but will study options

The Spokane City Council wants to study whether buying the YMCA building in Riverfront Park with Conservation Futures funds is the “highest and best use” of that money for the community. But that doesn’t mean the city is walking away from the proposal.

Eugster to run for City Council

The City Council race in south Spokane went from zero candidates to two Friday, with the prospect of becoming the most interesting election on the municipal ballot this fall. Former City Councilman Steve Eugster, a Spokane attorney and political activist, announced he would run for the spot after a six-year absence from the council.

Council considers Y’s fate

Spokane leaders have three weeks to decide the future of the downtown YMCA or risk forfeiting $1 million. The Spokane Park Board put the money down on the Y, which is surrounded by Riverfront Park, in 2006 in an effort to prevent private development on the land. To avoid losing the down payment, the Spokane City Council must come up with the remaining $4.4 million by May 4.