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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Minimum wage hike to $15 qualifies for Tacoma ballot

TACOMA – A citizens’ initiative to raise Tacoma’s minimum wage to $15 an hour has qualified for the November ballot. The Pierce County auditor’s staff has verified that petitions submitted by the 15 Now group contained 3,231 valid signatures of registered Tacoma voters, the News Tribune reported. Another 2,304 signatures were declared invalid for a variety of reasons.

City Council creates panel to craft paid sick leave legislation

Requiring employers in Spokane to provide workers paid sick leave took another step forward this week. The Spokane City Council on Monday approved the formation of a committee comprising health, labor and business representatives to help craft a paid-leave law.

Protesters call for $15 minimum wage

Marchers took to the streets of the nation’s cities Wednesday evening in support of a $15 an hour minimum wage, following a similar if much smaller rally in Spokane earlier in the day. About 25 people gathered outside of the Fred Meyer store in the East Central Neighborhood of Spokane at 9 a.m. The rally lasted just a few minutes before demonstrators boarded a Seattle-bound bus, where people from around the state gathered for a larger protest.

Wage, equal-pay, leave bills stalled in Washington Senate

OLYMPIA – Proposals for a $12 minimum wage, mandatory sick leave and a new equal-pay law could be dead in the Washington Legislature. Senate Commerce and Labor Committee Chairman Mike Baumgartner, R-Spokane, said Tuesday he had canceled a meeting at which those bills could have come up for a vote. He called the proposed minimum-wage hike, which would reach $12 in stages by 2019, the wrong policy for a state that essentially has two economies, a boom in the Seattle area but higher unemployment elsewhere.

WaLeg Day 79: No vote on $12 minimum wage

OLYMPIA -- A Senate committee will not vote on the proposed $12 minimum wage, a mandatory sick leave policy or a new equal pay law. Those proposals, which all passed the House, could be dead for the session.

Proposal to boost Washington minimum wage brings varied views

OLYMPIA – Raising the state’s minimum wage to $12 by 2019 was described as not enough by some and too much by others as a Senate committee provided another forum for what’s become a familiar debate in this session. Although the House approved that increase to the state’s current rate of $9.47 in a series of four annual bumps, other legislators said they had other, and in their minds better, approaches the Senate Commerce and Labor Committee should consider.

WALeg Day 78: $12 minimum wage debate continues

OLYMPIA – Raising the state’s minimum wage to $12 by 2019 was described as not enough by some and too much by others as a Senate committee provided another forum for what’s become a familiar debate in this session.

Minimum wage bill to get hearing in Senate

OLYMPIA – A proposal to raise the state’s minimum hourly wage to $12 by 2019 – which has proved a major bone of contention between Democrats and Republicans this session – is set for another round on March 30. The Senate Commerce and Labor Committee will hold a hearing on that bill and another passed by the House requiring many businesses to offer sick leave. Chairman Mike Baumgartner, R-Spokane, said Friday both could come up for a committee vote by April 1, the deadline for bills that have passed one chamber to be approved by a committee in the other.

$12 minimum wage bill to have March 30 hearing

OLYMPIA -- The proposal to raise the state's minimum wage to $12 over four years is set for a Senate hearing March 30. Senate Commerce and Labor Committee Chairman Mike Baumgartner said that bill, along with the sick and safe leave bill, would get a hearing a day before cut-off.

Washington House passes bill to raise minimum wage to $12

OLYMPIA – Washington would raise the minimum wage for most workers to $12 an hour by 2019 under a bill that passed the House on Tuesday after a spirited partisan debate. Democrats said it was a way to give workers at the bottom rungs of employment a chance to pay their way out of poverty. Republicans said it would make it even harder for young workers to get their first jobs and the work skills that would serve them later in life.

WALeg Day 51: House passes $12 minimum wage

OLYMPIA – Washington would raise the minimum wage for most workers to $12 an hour by 2020 under a bill that passed the House Tuesday after a spirited partisan debate.

Minimum wage hike, sick leave bills go to House

OLYMPIA – Proposals to raise the state’s minimum wage to $12 an hour over four years and require sick leave for most workers passed a key committee Thursday on partisan votes. Over objections from Republicans that it would hurt teenagers looking for their first jobs and put communities near the Idaho border at a disadvantage, Democrats on the House Appropriations Committee approved a plan to raise the minimum wage to $10 an hour next Jan. 1, $10.50 a year later, $11 a year after that and $12 at the start of 2020.

Dems send $12 wage, paid sick leave to full House

OLYMPIA – Proposals to raise the state’s minimum wage to $12 an hour over four years and require sick leave for most workers passed a key committee Thursday on partisan votes.

Minimum wage hike to $12 considered by Washington

OLYMPIA – To gauge the divide between the two chambers in this session, one need look no further than proposals on the minimum wage. Currently the highest for any state at $9.47 an hour, the Republican-controlled Washington Senate could cut it, at least for teens in summer jobs or new workers in training. The Democratic-controlled House could raise it for all workers, incrementally to $12 an hour by 2019.

Bills float wage floor for teens

OLYMPIA – Bosses could pay teen workers less in the summer or whenever they start a new job, under a pair of bills aired in a contentious Senate committee hearing Wednesday. New employees between ages 14 and 19 could be paid the federal minimum wage, $7.25 an hour, instead of the state minimum of $9.47, between June and August under one proposal sponsored by Sen. Mike Baumgartner. Another proposal by the Spokane Republican would let new employees between 16 and 19 receive 85 percent of the state minimum, or about $8.05.

WALeg Day 24: Spirited teen wage debate

OLYMPIA – Bosses could pay teen workers less in the summer or whenever they start a new job, under a pair of bills aired in a contentious Senate committee hearing Wednesday.

Statewide minimum wage of $12 debated

OLYMPIA – Raising Washington’s minimum wage to $12 an hour by 2019 was described Monday as too much for some businesses and not enough for some workers. Representatives of grocery stores, restaurants and farms told the House Labor Committee they would lose customers if they raised their rates or prices to pay higher wages.