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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Independent-minded Dunham dies at 83

Paul Dunham, the subject of a Spokesman-Review story Friday on the deeply held desire of many seniors to grow old in their own homes, died Monday. Dunham had lived in his Hayden mobile home with Nancy, his wife of 60 years, until Thursday when his health deteriorated and he needed constant care. At that point, his family moved him to the nearby home of his daughter, Kristi Taylor.

Paul Dunham dies at 83

Paul Dunham, the subject of a Spokesman-Review story Friday on the deeply held desire of many seniors to grow old in their own homes, died Monday.

Health care options expand for when age saps independence

A neuromuscular disorder has diminished Paul Dunham’s robust 160-pound frame to a skeletal 83 pounds over the past two decades. Since he was diagnosed with the condition, little pieces of independence – things many of us take for granted – have slipped away.

Mother’s suit faces challenges

Kathleen Smith was a sweet, 52-year-old woman whose body aged but her mind did not. She lived in state care from age 14 until her death at the Lakeland Village Nursing Facility in Medical Lake in 2006. Smith drowned after she was left unattended in a bathtub despite having a seizure disorder that required arm’s-length supervision at all times.

Sacred Heart, Holy Family announce 46 more layoffs

Sacred Heart Medical Center and Holy Family Hospital announced another 46 layoffs Monday, as the two Providence hospitals continue to adjust budgets to deal with a tough economy, fewer patients and scores of uninsured patients who are unable to pay their bills. The layoffs affected certified nursing aides. In addition, the hospital reduced the hours of five registered nurses, and accepted the voluntary resignations of two more nurses, who quit rather than accept new work assignments in different units, said Elaine Couture, chief executive of the hospitals.

Flu shots for patients on the go

Spokane-area residents got something healthier than french fries at a drive-through Saturday: flu shots. The drive-through influenza vaccination clinic, organized by the Spokane Regional Health District, was the first vaccination clinic of its kind in Spokane County.

Fairfield nursing home may reopen in months

A newly organized nonprofit group is trying to reopen a Fairfield nursing home closed in June by the Evangelical Lutheran Good Samaritan Society. Fairfield Care President Carl Felgenhauer said Good Samaritan, after failing to sell the facility, agreed to give his group a quitclaim deed to the property he said is important to the town’s economy.

The high cost of living

Jim Sinnott survived Pearl Harbor, joined his nation in picking up the pieces of that shattered day and helped his generation forge a more secure world for the next. Japanese dive bombers couldn’t stop the Navy radioman in 1941, but Parkinson’s disease is catching up with him nearly 69 years later.

Cooper George gets state order

For the second time this year, the state has ordered a Spokane retirement and assisted-living facility to stop placing new residents until it corrects several violations, including failure to report the alleged abuse of a patient. When a resident of Cooper George Senior Living, 707 W. Fifth Ave., told a caregiver that she had been fondled by another employee of the facility, the caregiver failed to report it, according to a report by Washington’s Aging and Disability Services Administration.

State: Assisted-living facility cannot place new residents

For the second time this year, the state has ordered a Spokane retirement and assisted-living facility to stop placing new residents until it corrects several violations, including failure to report the alleged abuse of a patient.

Waves of funding cuts imperil nursing homes

HARTFORD, Conn. – The nation’s nursing homes are perilously close to laying off workers, cutting services – possibly even closing – because of a perfect storm wallop from the recession and deep federal and state government spending cuts, industry experts say. A Medicare rate adjustment that cuts an estimated $16 billion in nursing home funding over the next 10 years was enacted at week’s end by the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services – on top of state-level cuts or flat-funding that already had the industry reeling.

A healing approach toward career, life

Everybody has a story. Bartenders know this. Psychologists know this. Journalists know this. It was the premise behind Charles Kuralt’s television essays, “On the road with Charles Kuralt,” which ran for 25 years. More recently, Steve Hartman has revisited the concept with an “Everybody Has a Story” segment on CBS’ “The Early Show.” And, on a local level, David K. Johnson wrote the long-running column “Everybody Has a Story” for the Lewiston Morning Tribune, eventually using it as the foundation for his 2002 book “No Ordinary Lives: One Man’s Surprising Journey into the Heart of America.”

Care provider acquitted in death

Michael Noland had to grieve the loss in 2006 of his friend, a developmentally disabled woman under his care in a state-operated facility. A year later, Noland was charged with second-degree manslaughter in connection with the death of 52-year-old Kathleen Smith, who had a seizure and drowned in a bathtub at Lakeland Village Nursing Facility in Medical Lake after Noland left her alone.

Trial begins in drowning at state nursing facility

Kathleen Smith, who was developmentally disabled, and care provider Michael Noland had a special relationship at the state-run Lakeland Village Nursing Facility in Medical Lake. Smith shared dinner with Noland and his wife at their home. “He took her to get ice cream. He would sing Ms. Smith to sleep every night. He adored her, and she adored him,” Assistant Public Defender Steve Heintz said Tuesday. “This was more than a client. This was a friend.”

Lawsuit dismissed against Extendicare

A federal lawsuit alleging consumer fraud against a national company operating homes for the elderly in Washington has been dismissed. Extendicare Homes Inc. operates 16 nursing homes in the state, including one in Spokane.

Senator tours new nursing facility

Washington state doesn’t just need more nurses; it needs more nursing teachers. The Washington State University College of Nursing Building will provide more of both. On Wednesday, dignitaries including U.S. Sen. Patty Murray and WSU President Elson Floyd toured the new $34.6 million facility built with state money on Spokane’s Riverpoint Campus.