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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Romney criticizes Obama in wake of embassy attacks

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (AP) — Republican Mitt Romney slammed the Obama administration's handling of foreign affairs after attacks on U.S. diplomatic missions in Egypt and Libya as foreign policy pushed to the front of the presidential campaign. Romney branded the administration's early response to the attacks as "disgraceful" in a statement the former Massachusetts governor released before confirmation that the American ambassador had been killed.

Day of reflection done, campaign on all over map

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (AP) — Reflection over Sept. 11 quickly past, the race for the White House is returning to fierce form, with negative ads free to fly again and the candidates spreading out from Florida to Ohio to Nevada. In a campaign speech and a new TV ad, President Barack Obama was accusing Republican nominee Mitt Romney of failing to explain how he would pay for trillions of dollars in tax cuts.

Delayed deportations approved ahead of elections

WASHINGTON (AP) — Less than two months before a presidential election in which both parties are fighting for the key Hispanic vote, the Obama administration has approved the first wave of applications from young illegal immigrants hoping to avoid deportation and get a work permit. The Homeland Security Department is notifying a small group of people this week that they have been approved to stay in the country for two years as part of President Barack Obama's Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. The first approvals come just three weeks after U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services started accepting applications for the program that Obama and Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano first announced June 15.

Partisan jibes on hold for 9/11 _ but not politics

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama and challenger Mitt Romney declared a fleeting truce for partisan digs Tuesday as the nation remembered the 9/11 terrorist attacks, but campaign politics crackled through even their somber observances. The campaigns pulled their negative ads and scheduled no rallies. But both candidates stayed in the public eye as the nation marked the 11th anniversary of the jetliner crashes that left nearly 3,000 dead.

In truce, Obama, Romney debate role of military

WASHINGTON (AP) — Looking to win voters even as they swore off negative attacks, President Barack Obama touted his administration's military accomplishments on the 11th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks while rival Mitt Romney warned against budget cuts that he said would be devastating to the armed forces. Obama pointed to gains in the war on terror during his time as commander in chief to make the case that Americans are better protected. "Al-Qaida's leadership has been devastated and Osama bin Laden will never threaten us again. Our country is safer and our people are resilient," the president said at a Pentagon memorial service.

Chicago teachers strike rolls into 2nd day

CHICAGO (AP) — Negotiators were back behind closed doors Tuesday on the second day of Chicago's teachers strike, but publicly the teachers union and school board couldn't even agree on whether they were close to a deal. The union issued a statement at midday saying negotiators had returned to the bargaining table and were discussing one of the most serious remaining issues, a new teacher evaluation system. But the union said it had signed off on only six of 48 articles in the contract and that the two sides had "a considerable way to go."

Is America safer? Presidential candidates disagree

WASHINGTON (AP) — Looking to win voters even as they swore off negative attacks, the presidential candidates clashed over whether the country is a safer place on the 11th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks. President Barack Obama pointed to gains in the war on terror under his time as commander in chief to make the case that Americans are better protected. "Al-Qaida's leadership has been devastated and Osama bin Laden will never threaten us again. Our country is safer and our people are resilient," the president said at a Pentagon memorial service.

Biden: Country hasn’t forgotten 9/11 families

SHANKSVILLE, Pa. (AP) — Ceremonies in New York City, Washington, D.C., and a western Pennsylvania field are a reminder that the nation hasn't forgotten the victims of the worst terrorist attack in U.S. history or their families, Vice President Joe Biden said Tuesday. "We wish we weren't here. We wish we didn't have to be here. We wish we didn't have to commemorate any of this," Biden told relatives and guests at the memorial for United Airlines Flight 93, the jet on which passengers fought hijackers for control before it crashed near Shanksville.

Partisan attacks on hold, but not politics

WASHINGTON (AP) — The presidential candidates are taking a break from their partisan attacks — but not all their politics — to remember the 9/11 anniversary. President Barack Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney pulled their negative ads and avoided appearing at campaign rallies in honor of the 11th anniversary of the terrorist strike. But the day offered Romney a chance in a speech to a meeting of the National Guard to address criticism that he didn't include a salute to the troops in his convention speech. Obama's camp sent former President Bill Clinton to swing-state Florida for an evening rally eight weeks before Election Day.

Boehner expresses no confidence on budget deal

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker John Boehner said Tuesday that he's not confident Congress can reach a budget deal and avoid a downgrading of the U.S. debt rating. Moody's Investors Service said Tuesday that it would likely cut its "Aaa" rating on U.S. government debt, probably by one notch, if budget negotiations fail.

Obama: US safer, resilient on 9/11 anniversary

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama are at Arlington National Cemetery visiting the graves of service members killed in Afghanistan and Iraq. The visit to the burial ground across the Potomac River from the White House is part of the president's observance of the 11th anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

Premiums for family health plans hit $15,745

WASHINGTON (AP) — Annual premiums for job-based family health insurance went up just 4 percent this year, but that's no comfort with the price tag approaching $16,000 and rising more than twice as fast as wages. The annual survey released Tuesday by two major research groups served as a glaring reminder that the nation's problem of unaffordable medical care is anything but solved.

Obamas observe 9/11 anniversary moment of silence

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama laid a wreath at the Pentagon, one of several observances marking the 11th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. Aided by a Marine honor guard, Obama place a white floral wreath on a metal stand above a concrete slab that said "Sept. 11, 2001 - 937 am." A moment of silence began at precisely 9:37 a.m.

Chicago kids, teachers brace for Day 2 of strike

CHICAGO (AP) — Rose Davis wasn't about to let her two young grandchildren walk alone through one of Chicago's most violent neighborhoods, even though they were going to a school kept open for students who needed a safe haven while teachers walked the picket line. So Davis, who has a painful diabetic condition that affects nerves in her legs, walked with them Monday the six blocks to Benjamin E. Mays Elementary Academy in Englewood — about five blocks farther than the school they normally attend — where they ate breakfast and lunch, read books, worked on computers and played games. She went back four hours later to escort them home.

Both campaigns eschew politics on 9/11 anniversary

WASHINGTON (AP) — The presidential candidates are taking a one-day pause from attacks in the heat of the campaign to observe the anniversary of the 9/11 attack. President Barack Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney pulled their negative ads and avoided campaign rallies in honor of the 11th anniversary of the terrorist strike. But with Election Day fast approaching, their campaigns were in full swing behind the scenes and Obama's camp sent former President Bill Clinton to swing-state Florida for an evening rally.

Chicago teacher strike poses test for unions

WASHINGTON (AP) — The massive teachers' strike in Chicago offers a high-profile test for the nation's teachers' unions, which have seen their political influence threatened as a growing reform movement seeks to improve ailing public schools. The reforms include expanding charter schools, getting private companies involved with failing schools and linking teacher evaluations to student test scores.

Chicago pupils, teachers brace for Day 2 of strike

CHICAGO (AP) — Rose Davis wasn't about to let her two young grandchildren walk alone through one of the city's most violent neighborhoods, even though they were going to a school kept open for students who needed a safe haven while teachers walked the picket line. So Davis, who has a painful diabetic condition that affects nerves in her legs, walked with them Monday the six blocks to Benjamin E. Mays Elementary Academy in Englewood — about five blocks farther than the school they normally attend — where they ate breakfast and lunch, read books, worked on computers and played games. She went back four hours later to escort them home.

Chicago teachers strike in bitter contract dispute

CHICAGO (AP) — For the first time in a quarter century, Chicago teachers walked out of the classroom Monday, taking a bitter contract dispute over evaluations and job security to the streets of the nation's third-largest city — and to a national audience — less than a week after most schools opened for fall. The walkout forced hundreds of thousands of parents to scramble for a place to send idle children and created an unwelcome political distraction for Mayor Rahm Emanuel. In a year when labor unions have been losing ground nationwide, the implications were sure to extend far beyond Chicago, particularly for districts engaged in similar debates.

Crucial Ohio at the heart of presidential campaign

MANSFIELD, Ohio (AP) — It's all about Ohio — again. The economy has improved here, and so has President Barack Obama's standing, putting pressure on Republican Mitt Romney in a state critical to his presidential hopes.

Colleagues mourn officer killed in Obama motorcade

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. (AP) — The danger in seemingly banal police work of directing traffic and shutting down roadways gained new attention Monday as colleagues mourned an officer who died while working on President Barack Obama's motorcade. Jupiter Police Officer Bruce St. Laurent, 55, was killed Sunday in West Palm Beach after his motorcycle was struck by a pickup truck while he prepared to shut down a stretch of Interstate 95 ahead of the motorcade.