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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago The Spokane City Council was contemplating an ordinance aimed at curtailing juvenile delinquency.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago Hecrick Eisenhour, described as a “comely miss of 20 years,” smiled prettily at Judge George Stocker.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago The Austrians engaged in a pitched battle with the Greeks – in a Spokane coffeehouse on Main Avenue.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago The Samuel Clemens trial in Colfax had people transfixed, because the story had elements of a tragic novel.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago A Spokane County prosecutor was willing to see if brain surgery might cure the criminal tendencies of M.C. Parsons, 20, charged with various felonies.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago Samuel Hill – remembered today for building the Maryhill Museum and a replica of Stonehenge in the Columbia Gorge – arrived in Spokane to talk about one of his overriding passions: good auto highways.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago Spokane prohibition advocates were celebrating the passage of the statewide prohibition law – yet they knew they had plenty of work to do.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago Miss Jennie Grey, of Yreka, California, was robbed of cash and diamonds worth $950 by a scoundrel named Ray Heasley, who promptly left town.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago After years of emotional debate, the state of Washington voted to go dry three years before the nation at large.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago On the morning after the 1914 election, a prohibition initiative was leading in Spokane County, but a proposal to institute an eight-hour workday was losing.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago Spokane police nabbed two men suspected of 16 armed robberies and burglaries over a two-week period. One suspect, Charles Rowe, 21, bragged that he was “cleaning up an average of $60 a night for two weeks.”

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago Halloween was relatively tame in Spokane, mainly because heavy rain kept many of the usual miscreants indoors.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago Spokane voters were bombarded with information from both sides on a ballot measure calling for the repeal of a city ordinance allowing for the “two-platoon system” for city firefighters.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago A fire destroyed the high school and eight houses in the mining town of Mace, Idaho, outside of Wallace.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago Between 2,000 and 3,000 visitors walked through Lewis and Clark High School to see the best students from every department demonstrate their proficiency. It was the school’s annual reception, or what today we would call the open house.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago William A. Pinkerton, head of the Pinkerton National Detective Agency, stopped in Spokane to say that he expected business to be booming over the winter.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago The newly formed Spokane branch of the Red Cross Society was deluged with offers of help in its first week of existence.