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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago Between 2,000 and 3,000 visitors walked through Lewis and Clark High School to see the best students from every department demonstrate their proficiency. It was the school’s annual reception, or what today we would call the open house.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago William A. Pinkerton, head of the Pinkerton National Detective Agency, stopped in Spokane to say that he expected business to be booming over the winter.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago The newly formed Spokane branch of the Red Cross Society was deluged with offers of help in its first week of existence. 

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago The brutal war in Europe continued to be good for Spokane business. The Washington Cracker Co. of Spokane just sent 30,000 pounds of crackers to German ports, destined to feed “part of the German army.”

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago Canadian military authorities were seeking to obtain 3,000 Inland Northwest horses to send to the British cavalry service. 

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago Miss Edith Cosgrove was outside her parent’s home on West Sixth Avenue when she looked up at the second floor porch and saw a burglar dangling from the railing. The burglar saw Miss Cosgrove so he swung himself back onto the porch “with the skill of a gymnast.”

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago Spokane’s first Red Cross organization was formally established in a meeting of 50 women at the Davenport Hotel’s Elizabethan Room.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago  An editorial writer mourned the passing of Col. E.H. Morrison, of Fairfield, an extraordinary man and “talented personality.”

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago Eddie Westrom and Roy Stovall, both 11, were playing on the banks of the Spokane River near Howard Street when suddenly, an apparition floated to the surface. It was a man’s body.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago Spokane’s Italian community staged a festive Columbus Day celebration at St. Aloysius Parish Hall. 

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago The front page headline doesn’t seem that earthshaking: “N.P. Grade Separation Work Awarded; To Begin at Once.”

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago George M. Martin pleaded guilty to robbing Spokane State Bank and locking the teller in the vault. But he blamed it all on a “split personality” he had suffered ever since a piece of a gun cartridge penetrated his eye and affected his brain.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago The Rev. Mark A. Matthews, “the black-maned lion of Seattle,” roared his prohibition message to a cheering crowd of 1,200 at North Central High School.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago Spokane Mayor W.J. Hindley finally relented and revoked his ban on newsreels showing scenes of the European war. 

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago Nearly all of Spokane’s churches joined wholeheartedly in observing a “day of prayer for peace,” as proclaimed by President Woodrow Wilson.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago People were getting increasingly nervous about two proposed progressive laws in the state, the first being the eight-hour workday law.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago Police finally tracked down and arrested George M. Martin, the prime suspect in the daring robbery of the Spokane State Bank more than a month earlier.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago The death of Rev. C.S. Pringle, 80, brought back memories of the earliest pioneer and missionary days in the Northwest – and one of the most notorious massacres.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago One of Spokane’s early attempts to become a filmmaking center couldn’t possibly have turned out worse.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago Palouse-area farmers renewed their attack on the proposed eight-hour workday law. They said it would be a particular hardship to farmers during harvest time.