Arrow-right Camera
The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
Partly Cloudy Night 51° Partly Cloudy

Tag search results

Tags let us describe our content with keywords, making it easier to find what you're most interested in. Use the search box to look for tags, or explore our coverage with the lists below.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago Joe Rudersdorf, Spokane’s dogcatcher and “humane society” officer, announced a plan to prevent the abuse of horses by wagon drivers going up the South Hill near Cannon Hill.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago Esther Elven, 25, woke up in her room at the Garni Hotel and discovered two men beside her, one dead and one dying.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago Spokane’s Interstate Fair was facing an existential crisis. It needed to raise $37,000 to pay its debts or face the loss of its fairgrounds and equipment.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago The Davenport Hotel’s first big “society” event was a “whirl of fashion” and a “flow of wit,” according to The Spokesman-Review.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago The Davenport Hotel had been open for about two weeks, but it was finally time for what a headline called the “Greatest Opening for the Greatest Hotel.”

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago Rain continued to dampen the Interstate Fair, yet 5,000 people turned out for the premier event, the Spokane Derby.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago Dutch Jake Goetz, Spokane’s saloon-casino-hotel magnate, was having a blast high atop his Coeur d’Alene Hotel.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago The Interstate Fair dominated the news in Spokane. The big event was the Northwest Polo Championship Tournament, in which Spokane had the rare opportunity to host the “sport of millionaires.”

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago Spokane was entering what society columnist Betty Graeme called “a gay whirl” of a week, with three gala events. They were:

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago The Spokesman-Review editorial page was celebrating a new “epoch for Spokane” with the formal opening of a new transcontinental rail line through Spokane. It was a “union” line, a joint venture of the Oregon-Washington Railway & Navigation Co. and the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul, known as the Milwaukee Road. 

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago Mrs. Anna Happel and her daughter Julia were in the Davenport Hotel, telling a harrowing tale of escaping the European war from their native Antwerp, Belgium. They said they fled Antwerp the same day a German zeppelin rained bombs down at the Belgian army headquarters and powder magazine in Antwerp. 

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago Spokane was mourning the loss of May Compton Burnett, 48, a Spokane pioneer nurse and one of the “best-known of her profession in the Inland Empire.”

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago Mayor W.J. Hindley, in his capacity as the official city censor, wanted to “expunge all European war pictures from the local theaters.”

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago Three masked robbers jumped from the woods and held up the “auto stage” of the Priest River-Priest Lake line and absconded with the passenger’s jewelry, watches and cash.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago A columnist named “Madame Isebell” in the Spokane Daily Chronicle provided what was headlined as “Home Exercises for Fleshy Women.”

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago A butcher from Garfield, Washington, professed to be shocked to be charged $4.60 for a haircut by Lizzie Kirkpatrick, a “lady barber” in Spokane.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago Spokane police were still pursuing bank robbery suspect George M. Martin. When he learned that police were on his trail, he went first to Genesee, Idaho, and then hired an auto and driver to take him to Troy, Idaho. Then he changed his mind in the middle of the trip and asked the driver to take him to Bovill, Idaho.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago The mysterious disappearance of Spokane mining executive M.H. Hare still was not quite solved.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago Spokane State Bank bookkeeper E.J. Peach was manning the teller’s cage by himself at lunchtime while the bank president was out.