Arrow-right Camera

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Thursday, October 22, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
Clear Day 35° Clear

Tag search results

Tags let us describe our content with keywords, making it easier to find what you're most interested in. Use the search box to look for tags, or explore our coverage with the lists below.

First days of voting in Oregon brings large numbers

Ballots for the 2020 election began to be mailed to Oregonians last Wednesday, and so far more than 88,000 people have casted their vote, following suit with the nationwide early voting trends.

Puerto Rico, unable to vote, becomes crucial to U.S. election

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico — The campaigns of President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden are rallying people in a place where U.S. citizens cannot cast ballots but have the ear of hundreds of thousands of potential voters in the battleground state of Florida.

Facebook braces for contested election, voter intimidation

Facebook said it’s readied new safeguards for the 2020 U.S. elections that have it better prepared to deal with candidates who prematurely declare victory or contest official results and the possibility of voter intimidation by alleged – and potentially armed – “poll watchers.”

President Trump not ready to commit to election results if he loses

 President Donald Trump is refusing to publicly commit to accepting the results of the upcoming White House election, recalling a similar threat he made weeks before the 2016 vote, as he scoffs at polls showing him lagging behind Democrat Joe Biden. Trump says it's too early to make such an ironclad guarantee.

America celebrates Fourth with parades, hot dogs, cold beer

The United States marks 239 years as an independent nation on Saturday as it celebrates the Fourth of July with parades, fireworks, naturalization ceremonies, eating contests and music. Here are some highlights and lowlights of Independence Day celebrations across the country: ___

Prosecutors: Gov. Walker part of criminal scheme

MADISON, Wis. (AP) — Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, a potential 2016 Republican presidential candidate, illegally coordinated fundraising with conservative groups as part of a nationwide "criminal scheme" to violate election laws, prosecutors said in court documents unsealed Thursday. No charges have been filed against Walker or any member of his staff. The documents were filed in December as part of an ongoing lawsuit by the conservative group Wisconsin Club for Growth, which challenged a secret investigation into campaign fundraising coordination.