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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Paris train attack hero makes bid for Congress from Oregon

In 2015, Alek Skarlatos and two friends thwarted an attack by a gunman on a Paris-bound train, a dramatic and heroic action that was made into a movie by Clint Eastwood in which the trio starred as themselves. Now, Skarlatos, 28, is hoping to ride his moment of fame to get a seat in Congress, representing Oregon’s 4th congressional district in the House of Representatives. 

Didier-Newhouse race a GOP face-off

Of Washington’s 10 congressional races this year, nine are relatively tame affairs with incumbents holding significant leads in campaign cash and comfortable cushions in the polls. And then there’s Central Washington’s 4th District, a Republican-on-Republican slugfest that some see as a fight between populist tea party insurgents and pragmatic business establishment for the soul of the GOP.

McMorris Rodgers will face Pakootas

Congress may be unpopular, but in Eastern Washington’s 5th Congressional District, five-term incumbent Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers was popular with voters casting ballots in Tuesday’s primary. McMorris Rodgers, a member of the GOP leadership in the House, finished the evening with more than half the votes cast in the 10-county district. She’ll face Democrat Joe Pakootas, the chief executive officer of the Colville Tribe’s business operations, in the general election and said she was encouraged by the strong showing in the four-way primary.

Twelve candidates crowd 4th Congressional District slate

An even dozen candidates are running for an open seat in Central Washington’s 4th Congressional District, making it the most crowded race in the state’s Aug. 5 primary. The district trends heavily Republican, and so did the candidate filings. Eight are Republicans, with two Democrats and two independents. Under the state’s primary system, the top two vote-getters advance to the general election, regardless of party.

Eight candidates seek to replace Hastings in 4th Congressional District

In a sign that politics abhors a vacuum almost as much as nature, an open seat in Central Washington’s 4th Congressional District has drawn eight candidates with two days left in the state’s filing week. State Sen. Janéa Holmquist Newbry, R-Moses Lake, on Wednesday afternoon joined six other Republicans and one Democrat seeking to replace 20-year veteran Richard “Doc” Hastings in a district that stretches from Canada to the Columbia River and includes Yakima and the Tri-Cities.

U.S. Rep. Hastings won’t seek re-election

Richard “Doc” Hastings, a Pasco businessman and former state legislator who became his Central Washington district’s longest-serving member of Congress, is calling it quits at the end of this year. Hastings, 73, announced Thursday he will not seek re-election to the 4th Congressional District seat he has held for 20 years.

Growth in every district will redraw Wash. congressional map

All congressional districts in Washington have too many people – tens of thousands too many. And in central Washington’s 4th District and two districts in the fast-growing Interstate 5 corridor, they’ve got more than 100,000 too many. Population figures released Wednesday by the U.S. Census Bureau confirm what state officials have long suspected: The state won’t just be adding its 10th congressional district this year. All existing nine must also shrink.