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Monday, October 19, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Review: Ben Affleck brings personal struggles to convincing performance in ‘The Way Back’

Though the focus is on Jack’s journey back to himself through the device of basketball, the best moments in “The Way Back” are the basketball itself. Affleck takes to the role of a hot-tempered coach like a duck to water, and the character, as written, plays on his innate qualities: a dry and snarky wit that makes him a lovable jerk, but a jerk nonetheless.

Washington sues Johnson & Johnson over opioids

Washington filed its third lawsuit tied to the opioid crisis Thursday, claiming one of the nation’s biggest companies deceived doctors and patients about the addictive nature of the painkillers it developed and marketed.

Daybreak Youth Services says $500,000 budget gap could force closure of treatment facilities in Spokane, Vancouver

Daybreak, which was founded in Spokane in 1978, says its financial situation follows the troubled expansion of its treatment facility in the Vancouver area. Now the organization is seeking loans and donations to continue providing services on both sides of the state. “The idea that Spokane youth, and youth across the state, will not have access to our services quite literally is a life-or-death situation that we are dealing with,” a spokeswoman said.

Shawn Vestal: Treatment is everyone’s favorite solution, but it’s not so simple

Often, when social issues become politicized – whether it’s homelessness in Spokane or gun violence nationwide – there is a brief, urgent flare of interest in “treatment” as a solution. Treatment for addicts. Treatment for the mentally ill. Sounds good. Makes sense. And it’s too simplistic by half, because the scope and complexity of the problem dwarfs the available resources and, with addiction in particular, there is the stubborn problem at the heart of recovery known as human motivation.