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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Friday, October 30, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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American Institute of Architects Spokane announces 2020 design award winners

In an Oct. 23 Facebook Live virtual event, AIA’s Spokane chapter honored five architecture firms for projects designed over a two-year period across four categories: built architecture over $5 million, built architecture under $5 million, renovation architecture and unbuilt designs.

Input sought on effort to create Cliff-Cannon historic district

A five-year effort to make the Cliff/Cannon Neighborhood a locally registered historic district is picking up speed ahead of a planned workshop at Wednesday’s meeting of the Spokane Plan Commission, where the public can offer comments.

Then and Now: Hoban Building

The sturdy, two-story building on the North Monroe corridor has been home to a plumber, an antique shop and a public radio station in its more than 110 years of existence.

Then and Now: The Spokane Falls Review tower

Opened in October 1891, the 10-story, 146-foot tower at the corner of Riverside Avenue and Monroe Street nearly put the publishers of the Review out of business, financially. William H. Cowles, the 24-year-old son of an executive at the Chicago Tribune, proposed a merger with his Spokesman newspaper.

Then and Now: Old City Hall

Built in 1912, Old City Hall was actually the second permanent home for city offices after a building in Riverfront Park was sold to the railroads for $352,000. When it opened, Mayor W.J. Hindley promised that the structure at the corner of Spokane Falls Boulevard and Wall Street would be a temporary home for city offices until a more grand structure could be built. City operations remained headquartered there for another 70 years.

Difference Makers: U.S. Pavilion redesigners create iconic structure in the heart of the city

Forty-six years ago – with just 72 days before the World’s Fair officially kicked off in Spokane – Tim Welsh climbed to the top of the incomplete U.S. Pavilion, popped the collar of his thick flannel jacket against the February chill and smiled for the camera. “All those cables you see, I measured every one of them. I did most of the surveying and layout of the project,” said Welsh, who was project engineer on the U.S. Pavilion for Expo ’74.

New brewery in West Central in works

Orcutt Brewery will be built on a vacant lot across the street from the car wash facility constructed in 2016 on a full city block at Gardner Avenue and Ash Street.

Then and Now: The Bennett Block

Oregon-born Bascomb H. Bennett originally owned a hotel on the site at Howard and Main, but it was burned in the great fire of 1889. Today, the Bennett Block is home to a mix of retail and office space and is still owned by the descendants of brewer John G. F. Hieber, who purchased the block in 1909.

The Dirt: Second Harvest prepares adjacent building for expansion

Second Harvest is expanding into an adjacent building, according to city permit data. The building next to its current food distribution warehouse at 402 N. Perry St. is undergoing a $400,000 renovation, turning the 24,000-square-foot building into a warehouse focused on feeding hungry children.

Second Harvest prepares adjacent building for expansion

The building next to its current food distribution warehouse at 402 N. Perry St. is undergoing a $400,000 renovation, turning the 24,000-square-foot building into a warehouse focused on feeding hungry children.