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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Inslee signs capital gains tax into law

A 7% tax on capital gains is now law after Gov. Jay Inslee signed the long-awaited bill on Tuesday, but there could still be a long way to go until it is implemented.

Gov. Inslee proposes major spending boost, new capital gains tax

Gov. Jay Inslee will ask the Legislature for an extra $9.7 billion in spending in the state’s main budget over the next two years to pay for improvements to public schools and the mental health system, higher teacher and state worker salaries and environmental protections that would help save threatened salmon and Orcas.

Committee OKs Washington tax bill

The House Finance Committee passed a $3.5 billion tax package that majority Democrats described as a “work in progress.”

Divided Legislature looking at long session

A basic education funding solution should not go to the voters, because the issue is too complex. This is a job for legislators. It’s why they’re elected.

Gary Crooks: A modest proposal to fund schools

We could come up with a solution to fully funding basic education in Washington state: “A Modest Proposal for Preventing Children From Being a Burden to Wealthy Taxpayers.”

Progress reported on state budget process

OLYMPIA – Gov. Jay Inslee and legislative leaders seemed to concur Friday that they are closing in on an agreement on the 2015-17 state budget, something that has eluded them for 155 days. But they didn’t completely agree on how close, or the components of that agreement.

State capital gains tax wins favor at Democratic hearing

OLYMPIA – With most legislators away from the Capitol and any budget negotiations behind closed doors, Democrats invited people from around the state to a hearing to support a capital gains tax and several other budget items they’d like to get in the current special session. The “People’s Hearing” – which had the feel of an official legislative committee hearing but none of the authority – was an indictment of the state’s tax system and a plea for more money for schools and state services. One speaker from each of the state’s 49 legislative districts got two minutes to explain something he or she thought lawmakers should do. The most common theme was to ease the tax burden on the poor and increase it on the wealthy through a capital gains tax. The Legislature has two different proposals for taxing investment income, a House proposal for 5 percent on gains above $5,000 for an individual taxpayer, and a Senate proposal for 7 percent on gains above $50,000.

Special Session Day 6: ‘People’s Hearing’ calls for tax changes

OLYMPIA – With most legislators away from the Capitol and any budget talks going on behind closed doors, Democrats invited people from around the state to a hearing to support a capital gains tax and several other budget items they’d like to get in the special session.

Parties offer dueling education plans at 11th hour

OLYMPIA – Democrats and Republicans unveiled different plans Wednesday to pump more state money into public schools just as the Legislature is supposed to be wrapping up this year’s session. Senate Democrats proposed a capital gains tax on the state’s wealthiest residents, those who earn more than $250,000 a year on their investments. It would raise an estimated $1.3 billion and provide the money for the state to take over a responsibility it has been shirking for years – paying the basic salaries of teachers and other school personnel.