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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Is your child in the right car seat? New guidelines to check

Instead of children being in rear-facing seats until they turn 2, the American Academy of Pediatrics is now recommending that children stay in rear-facing seats as long as possible until they meet the upper number for that seat’s height or weight limits.

Collision blocks downtown Spokane intersection

Traffic is congested at a busy downtown Spokane intersection as police investigate a collision that toppled an SUV this morning and sent five people to area hospitals for treatment.

Car seat emphasis patrols start Thursday

Spokane County law enforcement obtained a continuation of an April grant to promote the correct use of child car seats through education and enforcement.

Mr. Dad: For safety keep seat facing rear

Dear Mr. Dad: I’m in charge of installing our 16-month-old daughter’s car seat and my wife says I need to turn it around to rear-facing again because there’s a new regulation. But my daughter loves looking forward. Is it really necessary to make her face rear again?

Mother cleared in crash fatal to baby

A vehicular homicide charge was dismissed Thursday against a Post Falls mother whose daughter was fatally injured five years ago while riding in an improperly installed car seat. Spokane County Superior Court Judge Tari Eitzen agreed with defense arguments that 26-year-old Eileen C. Jensen’s failure to correctly use the car seat was tragic but not criminally negligent, ending a legal case that brought widespread public attention to car seat safety issues.

Judge dismisses homicide charge in car seat case

A vehicular homicide charge was dismissed Thursday against a Post Falls mother whose daughter was fatally injured while riding in an improperly installed car seat five years ago. Spokane County Superior Court Judge Tari Eitzen agreed with defense arguments that 26-year-old Eileen C. Jensen’s failure to correctly use the car seat was tragic but not criminally negligent, ending a legal case that brought widespread public attention to car seat safety issues.

On one vital safety issue, kids should take back seat

Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for children between the ages of 2 and 14, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Child safety seats reduce fatal injury by 71 percent for infants and 54 percent for toddlers. The monthlong focus of Our Kids: Our Business is growing children into successful adults. The proper use of child safety seats can help get them to adulthood, period. Some car seat facts:

How to install an infant car seat

Spokane police Officer Teresa Fuller guides parents through the steps for properly installing a rear-facing child safety seat for infants.

Girl dies in crash after driver reaches for cell

A 6-year-old girl from Grant County died Monday evening in a one-car rollover accident that occurred when her mother, the driver, reached for a cell phone, sheriff’s deputies said.

Police to emphasize child safety restraints

Spokane sheriff’s deputies and Spokane Valley police will be monitoring traffic at seven locations through this month to increase enforcement and public awareness of child safety restraint laws.

Face Time: Spokane police officer, mother on child safety seat mission

A child’s death in a crash is something Spokane police Officer Teresa Fuller works hard to prevent. She has spent many Saturdays crawling into cars, trucks and vans during car seat clinics to make sure a child’s safety seat does its job in the event of a crash.

Our View: Crash shows kids’ car safety requires vigilance

Given Washington state’s historic role in establishing child booster seat requirements, it was especially distressing to read that the law was ignored in Thursday’s crash involving two city-owned vans transporting 19 children from the Northeast Youth Center to two elementary schools. Six of the children were required to be strapped into booster seats. Not one of them was. Fortunately, nobody was seriously hurt, though 15 children were transported to hospitals. That’s a phone call no parent wants to receive. Police say the appropriate parties will receive citations, but we can all learn from the incident.

Children in van crash weren’t in safety seats

Although the city-owned vans involved in a crash in northeast Spokane on Thursday were equipped with booster seats, none of the children was buckled into one, police said.

Getting there: Keep kids in the back

Spokane law enforcement officers found scores of child safety-restraint violations in March during the first stage of a program to improve compliance with the law.

Change to state car-seat law could benefit poor families

BOISE – An Idaho senator says the state could get federal money to purchase safety seats for low-income families, but the state car seat law would have to be changed. Sagle Republican Sen. Joyce Broadsword told the Senate Transportation Committee on Thursday that federal money would depend on changing a law that allows children under 6 to be out of a safety seat if there are not enough seat belts in the vehicle or if the child has needs that have to be tended to, such as breast-feeding.