Arrow-right Camera
The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
Partly Cloudy Day 53° Partly Cloudy

Tag search results

Tags let us describe our content with keywords, making it easier to find what you're most interested in. Use the search box to look for tags, or explore our coverage with the lists below.

Shawn Vestal: Tiny homes might be foundation to build upon

What if one weapon to fight homelessness was actually something very small, affordable and obvious? What if it just boiled down to providing a house? A tiny, tiny house? It would be too simplistic – by far – to say that this would erase homelessness. But various communities are experimenting with tiny-house villages for the homeless: providing very small, relatively inexpensive homes in a setting with access to medical and social services. Now a Spokane man is trying to get a project off the ground that would combine work-skills training with tiny-home villages on church or nonprofit land, allowing homeless people to work toward ownership of small homes themselves.

Change for the Better program helps homeless get back on track

The loud hammering coming from the gymnasium in the basement of Central United Methodist Church doesn’t come from a building improvement project – it comes from several personal improvement projects. On a recent Friday afternoon, Change for the Better, a program that’s part of the church’s $100,000 initiative to help the homeless, is organizing toys for Goodwill Industries of the Inland Northwest and producing leather bracelets reading “Change Spokane” to sell at local craft fairs and markets.

Church launches plan to address homelessness

At the corner of West Third Avenue and South Howard Street, where drug deals are common and panhandling yields profits, the staff at Central United Methodist Church has a front-row seat to the issue of homelessness. The church is done waiting for someone else to come up with a solution to both sides of the issue: helping those who are homeless and cleaning up the downtown area.

Religion Notebook: Thanksgiving Day service planned

First Church of Christ, Scientist, 310 E. 14th Ave., will hold its Thanksgiving Day service today at 10 a.m. The church has offered this service for more than 100 years. It includes a Bible lesson, the national Thanksgiving Day Proclamation, prayer, hymns and words of gratitude from the congregation.

Religion Notebook: Church looking for help with mural Saturday

Central United Methodist Church, 518 W. Third Ave., is looking for volunteers to give Inspiration Alley a facelift. The alley, situated behind the church, has graffiti on its walls. Several guests of Shalom Ministries have planned a mural that will reach from Stevens to where the art of CUMC begins.

Religion Notes: Church offers free family fun night

Central United Methodist Church, 518 W. Third Ave., will present a family fun night at 6 p.m. Saturday. The evening will feature games, refreshments, a silent auction and karaoke. The event will raise funds for Central United Methodist Women and their work supporting women and children around the world.

Church Notes: Buddhist Temple food festival this weekend

Spokane Buddhist Temple, 927 S. Perry St., will present its 21st Annual Fall Food Festival on Sunday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. The festival, Aki Matsuri, will offer chicken and vegetarian yakisoba bento box lunches with miso soup or Japanese cabbage for $12, available for dine-in or carry-out.

Religion Notebook: Fall festival planned

Central United Methodist Church, 518 W. Third St., will hold a Community Fall Festival Saturday from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. The festival offers a lunch of soup, salad bar, dessert and coffee or tea for $5, local crafts, baked goods, and a quilt raffle.

Group that helps homeless seeks donations as cold hits

It’s time to clean out that coat closet. Spokane Mental Health’s Homeless Outreach Team needs at least a couple hundred more men’s and women’s coats for its 11th annual Winter Wear Drive in conjunction with Hunger and Homeless Awareness Week.

Creative crime fighting

Until recently, there were two things one could be sure to encounter at Shalom Ministries at the beginning of the day: hungry people and fresh graffiti facing the alley behind Central United Methodist Church. Shalom has been feeding homeless and low-income downtown residents in the basement of the church at Third Avenue and Howard Street since 1994, and program coordinator Holly Chilinski was getting more and more frustrated by the constant graffiti problem.

Ministry turns to graffiti art to counter tagging

Until recently, there were two things one could be sure to encounter at Shalom Ministries at the beginning of the day: hungry people and fresh graffiti facing the alley behind Central United Methodist Church. Shalom has been feeding homeless and low-income downtown residents in the basement of the church at Third Avenue and Howard Street since 1994, and program coordinator Holly Chilinski was getting more and more frustrated by the constant graffiti problem.