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Sunday, October 25, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Late-night ghost town: Watch TV hosts perform without audiences amid coronavirus

The New York late-night circuit was the antithesis of “Live in Front of a Studio Audience” this week, prerecording shows without a crowd due to coronavirus fears. Samantha Bee, Jimmy Fallon and Stephen Colbert were among the first comedians to test their material in front of no one for the first time. Well, almost no one.

Man charged with stabbing girlfriend near Colbert

A 40-year-old man was arrested Monday night after allegedly admitting to detectives he had stabbed his girlfriend in the leg during an argument at a home near Colbert. Aaron J. Lahde was booked into the Spokane County Jail early Tuesday on a first-degree assault charge.

Colbert I. King: Stepping out of the shadows of my depression

I don’t know much about Jason Kander, except what I read about him in the news. A former Army intelligence officer and Afghanistan veteran. First millennial to win a statewide office when he was elected Missouri secretary of state in 2012. Up-and-coming Democratic Party leader. Last week, Kander abandoned his campaign to become mayor of Kansas City, Missouri, citing symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder and depression that he traces to his tour of duty in Afghanistan. He had a hole inside that he was hiding from himself and the world, he said. To his credit, he faced up to a problem that he did not bring on himself. He went so far as to state publicly that he was depressed to the point of calling the Department of Veterans Affairs’ Veterans Crisis Line, “tearfully conceding that, yes, I have had suicidal thoughts.”

John Mellencamp takes a knee for Black Lives Matter

Just days before the Super Bowl, John Mellencamp sank to his knees in support of the Black Lives Matter movement after performing a political ballad on the “Late Show With Stephen Colbert.”