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Friday, October 30, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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WDFW: Sockeye and steelhead fishing closes on Columbia River mainstem

With sunny weather and consistent high river flows boosting catch numbers in the lower river, the Columbia River mainstem from the Megler-Astoria Bridge upstream to Highway 395 Bridge at Pasco will close to sockeye salmon and steelhead fishing earlier than previously scheduled, state fishery managers announced.

Work group will discuss Columbia salmon management

The Columbia River Salmon Fishery Policy Workgroup will hold a virtual public meeting later this month to continue its work reviewing the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission’s policy on salmon management in the Columbia River basin. The workgroup, made up of three commission members, will meet May 27 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The meeting will be conducted via webinar in response to continued concerns about the spread of COVID-19. The public will be able to view the meeting online and provide testimony, according to a WDFW news release.

Tom Karier: Time for a new Columbia River treaty

By delaying a new Columbia River agreement with Canada, the State Department is not only costing the Northwest valuable carbon-free power, it is also jeopardizing the health and safety of U.S. citizens who live in floodplains along the river.

Idaho fishing towns object to Columbia River study

Business leaders from some of Idaho’s smallest towns located along some of its best salmon and steelhead rivers are telling the federal government that angling is vital to their economies and steps must be taken to preserve the hard-fighting fish.

Hanford boosts contaminated groundwater cleanup to protect the Columbia River

The Hanford nuclear reservation is expanding its capacity to clean chemical and radioactive contamination from the groundwater. “That will reduce the time needed to clean up the groundwater,” said Mike Cline, the Department of Energy project director for cleanup of soil and groundwater at Hanford. “The more water we can treat, the quicker we can complete total cleanup.”

Pacific Northwest tribes: Remove Columbia River dams

Two Pacific Northwest tribes are demanding the removal of three major hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River. The Lummi and Yakama nations said Monday that the U.S. government was in violation of a treaty from 1855 when it built the concrete dams on the lower Columbia River, destroying important native fishing sites and the migration of salmon. The three dams are a critical part of a complex hydroelectric network in Oregon, Washington and Idaho that powers the region.

Columbia River barge lock to return to service Sept. 30

Officials say barges carrying wheat, wood and other goods will remain at a standstill for the rest of the month while workers repair a critical navigation lock at the Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River.

Broken lock shuts down barge traffic on Columbia River system

One of two ways that Pacific Northwest farmers get their wheat to export in Portland has been shut down after the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers stopped barge traffic on the Columbia River around the Bonneville Dam after a crack was found on a critical part of one of its massive locks.