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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Tuesday, October 20, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Gardening: New group will help organize community gardens

In late November, the Spokane Community Gardens Association was created in partnership with the Spokane Associated Garden Clubs. The Associated Garden Clubs have been supporting community beautification projects for decades and wanted to expand their mission to growing food. The new group will bring the more than 20 community gardens in the area under one network that will help marshal resources, develop gardens and provide an advocacy voice for community food production.

Community garden keepers brace for heat

If you want to enjoy your homegrown lettuce, you better pick it before the three-digit temperatures hit this weekend. That’s the advice of Teresa Sadler, garden coordinator at the Pumpkin Patch Garden off Argonne Road just north of the Spokane River.

Sundance Meadows residents launch community garden

Weeds and rocks and more rocks. Not the view Steve Groth wanted to see when he looked out over the 55-plus retirement community where he lives near Nine Mile, just north of the Sun Dance Golf Course. So the farmer did what farmers do: He tilled it up and got to work. For weeks, Groth and about a dozen residents from the Sundance Meadows Gated Community have toiled in the rocky, sandy soil to create a community garden that will provide vegetables and fruit for everyone in the neighborhood including those not able to work in the 50-by-90-foot plot. If the harvest reaps extra food, the community will donate the excess to Second Harvest.

Spokane Valley Partners bringing community garden to Edgecliff

On Elizabeth Road, just south of Sprague Avenue, there is a small patch of land waiting to be turned into a lush, green space, with neighbors working the land and getting to know one another. Spokane Valley Partners is expanding its community garden program to Edgecliff. That neighborhood has struggled to maintain community gathering spots, especially since the closure of Pratt Elementary in 2007.

Spokane Valley Partners bringing community garden to Edgecliff

On Elizabeth Road, just south of Sprague Avenue, there is a small patch of land waiting to be turned into a lush, green space, with neighbors working the land and getting to know one another. Spokane Valley Partners is expanding its community garden program to Edgecliff. That neighborhood has struggled to maintain community gathering spots, especially since the closure of Pratt Elementary in 2007.

Community gardens adjust for well concerns

Earlier this year it looked like two community gardens would have to be moved, because they are located too close to city wellheads and violate Washington State Department of Health drinking water regulations. The announcement surprised organizers of the Hillyard Garden, on East Hoffman Avenue and Crestline Street, and the East Central Community Garden, on East Hartson Avenue. The Hillyard garden has been in its location for three years and the East Central garden for five.

Community reaping

It’s only about 1 acre of wheat, but on Thursday morning it got all the attention at East Valley Farm and Community Garden. A small combine from Crop Production Services chewed its way through the wheat as farm coordinator Lynette Romney looked on and took pictures.

First-year garden full of produce

At the beginning of May, it was little more than a vacant field with a couple of raised beds. Today, it’s been transformed into a lush garden, growing fresh produce for Spokane Valley Partners and a handful of neighbors who have rented beds.

Spokane Valley Partners community garden could open soon

At Spokane Valley Partners, plans are in the works to finally start its own community garden. Modern Electric has donated the use of about 2.4 acres behind the south parking lot of Valley Mission Park, just off Mission Avenue and Pierce Road. If all goes well, gardeners could be able to plant as early as May 18.

Liberty Lake adds more beds for community garden program

The community garden at Liberty Lake’s arboretum has expanded – thanks to its popularity last year. The garden was fully reserved last year as were the 11 raised beds at Rocky Hill Park. The city took a look at its waiting list last fall and added four beds at the end of the growing season and another eight in March.

Gardens evicted over water safety

Two community gardens located on Spokane Water Department property will have to move by the end of the year. The Hillyard Garden – also known as the Pump House Garden – located on East Hoffman Avenue and Crestline Street, and the East Central Community Garden, located on East Hartson Avenue, have both been asked to pull up roots and move.

Abundant effort helps South Hill garden grow

The Commons Community Garden, just across the street from Sacajawea Middle School on the South Hill, is an excellent example of creative use of space. It’s located on a triangular piece of land next to the water tower there, and although it’s a smaller space than many other community garden sites, it holds 35 raised garden beds.