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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Europe’s COVID-19 crisis pits vaccinated against unvaccinated

BRUSSELS – This was supposed to be the Christmas in Europe where family and friends could once again embrace holiday festivities and one another. Instead, the continent is the global epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic as cases soar to record levels in many countries.

Pfizer says COVID-19 pill cut hospital, death risk by 90%

Pfizer Inc. said Friday that its experimental antiviral pill for COVID-19 cut rates of hospitalization and death by nearly 90% in high-risk adults, as the drugmaker joined the race for an easy-to-use medication to treat the coronavirus.

New Mexico judge denies lab workers’ claim in vaccine fight

A New Mexico judge on Friday denied a request by dozens of scientists and others at Los Alamos National Laboratory to block a vaccine mandate, meaning workers risk being fired if they don't comply with the lab's afternoon deadline.

President Biden, a convert to vaccine mandates, champions compliance

ELK GROVE VILLAGE, Il. — President Joe Biden on Thursday championed COVID-19 vaccination requirements, determined that the roughly 67 million unvaccinated American adults must get the shot even as he acknowledged that mandates weren't his “first instinct.”

3rd Alaska hospital invokes crisis care mode in COVID spike

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — A third Alaska hospital has instituted crisis protocols that allow it to ration care if needed as the state recorded the worst COVID-19 diagnosis rates in the U.S. in recent days, straining its limited health care system.

Russians flock to antibody tests; West notes tool’s limit

MOSCOW – When Russians talk about the coronavirus over dinner or in hair salons, the conversation often turns to “antitela,” the Russian word for antibodies – the proteins produced by the body to fight infection.

Same goal, different paths: U.S., EU seek max vaccine rates

BRUSSELS – The Belgian town of Aarschot has a vaccination rate of 94% of all adults, but Mayor Gwendolyn Rutten worries her town is too close for comfort to the capital of Brussels, where the rate stands at 63%. But there’s not much she can do about it.

Germany urges vaccine shots; warns of fall COVID-19 surge

BERLIN — Germany's top health official is urging more citizens to get vaccinated, warning Saturday that if the vaccination numbers don't go up the country's hospitals may get overwhelmed by COVID-19 patients toward the end of the year.

With no beds, hospitals ship patients to far-off cities

MISSION, Kan. — Many overwhelmed hospitals, with no beds to offer, are putting critically ill COVID-19 patients on planes, helicopters and ambulances and sending them hundreds of miles to far-flung states for treatment.

US averaging 100,000 new COVID-19 infections a day

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. – The COVID-19 outbreak in the United States crossed 100,000 new confirmed daily infections Saturday, a milestone last exceeded during the winter surge and driven by the highly transmissible delta variant and low vaccination rates in the South.

Europe’s COVID-19 vaccine passes reveal some pockets of resistance

Shouts of “Liberty!” have echoed through the streets and squares of Italy and France as thousands show their opposition to plans to require vaccination cards for normal social activities, such as dining indoors at restaurants, visiting museums or cheering in sports stadiums.

CDC mask guidance met with hostility by leading Republicans

SALT LAKE CITY — As he rallied conservatives on Wednesday, one of the Republican Party's most prominent rising stars mocked new government recommendations calling for more widespread use of masks to blunt a coronavirus surge.

Death rates soar in Southeast Asia as virus wave spreads

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia — Indonesia has converted nearly its entire oxygen production to medical use just to meet the demand from COVID-19 patients struggling to breathe. Overflowing hospitals in Malaysia had to resort to treating patients on the floor. And in Myanmar’s largest city, graveyard workers have been laboring day and night to keep up with the grim demand for new cremations and burials.