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Friday, October 23, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Here’s what you need to know about the Capital One data breach

The alleged hacker, Paige A. Thompson, obtained Social Security and bank account numbers in some instances, as well other information such as names, birthdates, credit scores and self-reported income, the bank said Monday. It said no credit card account numbers or log-in credentials were compromised.

Delta, AmEx renew credit card deal; Delta boosts outlook

American Express and Delta Air Lines extended their credit card partnership through 2029, the companies jointly announced Tuesday, a significant extension of one of the larger financial partnerships between a major U.S. airline and a credit card company.

Apple is jumping belatedly into the streaming TV business

Jumping belatedly into a business dominated by Netflix and Amazon, Apple announced its own TV and movie streaming service Monday, enlisting such superstars as Oprah Winfrey, Jennifer Aniston and Steven Spielberg to try to overcome its rivals’ head start.

Beware at the pump: Black market fuel making millions

A black market for diesel and gasoline has rapidly spread around the nation, with organized crime gangs using fraudulent credit cards to syphon millions of dollars in fuel from gas stations into large tanks hidden inside pickup trucks and vans.

Credit cards give investors jitters, but bankers sleep fine

For Kevin St. Pierre, the math on credit cards is pretty simple. “Generally, if the consumer has income, they pay their debts,” St. Pierre, an analyst at Sanford C. Bernstein, said in a note to clients last week. “Consumer credit losses are driven predominantly by unemployment.”

Liz Weston: How to ruin your finances fast

Some financial disasters are a long time in the making. It typically takes years of unfortunate choices – minimum credit card payments, forgone savings opportunities – to create suffocating debt or a poverty-level retirement.