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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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How to talk to children about a relative diagnosed with Alzheimer’s

Luisa Echevarria remembers not understanding why her grandmother's behavior suddenly changed. "I was always very tuned into the adults," she said, recalling hearing her uncle and mother mentioning her grandmother was acting differently. "I started to notice these things, too."

An abundance of risk, not caution, before Trump’s diagnosis

WASHINGTON – Standing well apart on the debate stage, President Donald Trump and his Democratic opponent Joe Biden looked out at an odd sight – one section of the room dutifully in masks, the other section flagrantly without.

Woman sues, says she was hospitalized after prison dentistry

 A woman who says she suffered a life-threatening infection after Idaho’s prison staffers denied her antibiotics following dental surgery is suing state officials and Corizon Health, claiming she was subjected to cruel and unusual punishment.

Scientists get closer to blood test for Alzheimer’s disease

An experimental blood test was highly accurate at distinguishing people with Alzheimer’s disease from those without it in several studies, boosting hopes there soon might be a simple way to help diagnose this most common form of dementia.

Regis Philbin, television personality and host, dies at 88

NEW YORK – Regis Philbin, the genial host who shared his life with television viewers over morning coffee for decades and helped himself and some fans strike it rich with the game show “Who Wants to Be a Millionaire,” has died at 88.

U.S. should build up antibody therapy supply, ex-FDA chief says

The United States should be building up reserves of therapeutic antibodies now ahead of any potential approval or emergency use authorization to treat the coronavirus, said the former head of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

US doctor infected with Ebola arrives in Nebraska

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — A doctor who became infected with Ebola while working in Liberia — the third American aid worker sickened with the virus — arrived Friday at a Nebraska hospital for treatment. Officials at the Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha have said Dr. Rick Sacra, 51, will be treated at the hospital's 10-bed special isolation unit, the largest of four such units in the U.S.

Angelina Jolie says she had double mastectomy

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Angelina Jolie says that she has had a preventive double mastectomy after learning she carried a gene that made it extremely likely she would get breast cancer. The Oscar-winning actress and partner to Brad Pitt made the announcement in the form of an op-ed she authored for Tuesday's New York Times (http://nyti.ms/17o4A0f ) under the headline, "My Medical Choice." She writes that between early February and late April she completed three months of surgical procedures to remove both breasts.

FDA warns doctors of counterfeit Botox

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal regulators have warned more than 350 medical practices that Botox they may have received from a Canadian supplier is unapproved and could be counterfeit or unsafe. The Food and Drug Administration said in a letter sent last month, a letter released publicly last week, that batches of the wrinkle treatment shipped by suppliers owned by pharmacy Canada Drugs have not been approved by the FDA and that the agency cannot assure their effectiveness or their safety.

President’s pot comments prompt call for policy

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — President Barack Obama says he won't go after pot users in Colorado and Washington, two states that just legalized the drug for recreational use. But advocates argue the president said the same thing about medical marijuana — and yet U.S. attorneys continue to force the closure of dispensaries across the U.S. Welcome to the confusing and often conflicting policy on pot in the U.S., where medical marijuana is legal in many states, but it is increasingly difficult to grow, distribute or sell it. And at the federal level, at least officially, it is still an illegal drug everywhere.

Pot proponents hopeful, wary after Obama comments

SEATTLE (AP) — Officials and pot advocates looking for any sign of whether the Obama administration will sue to block legal pot laws in Washington state and Colorado or stand idly by as they are implemented got one from the president himself. But it did little to clear the air.

Calif Gov. Brown being treated for prostate cancer

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California Gov. Jerry Brown is being treated with radiation for early stage prostate cancer, his office announced Wednesday. The 74-year-old Brown is receiving a short course of conventional radiotherapy for "localized prostate cancer," the statement said.

Washington could become pot source for neighbors

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Now that marijuana is legal in neighboring Washington state, Portland police are offering some helpful advice to Oregon pot users. Sure, you can go over to Washington state to "smoke some weed," a police advisory states, but you might get arrested for driving under the influence if you're pulled over coming home, even if you're on a bike. And if you are among the 55,000 people with an Oregon medical marijuana card, Portland police say you'll be able to get your allowed amount of medicine in Washington state. Still, even though you now can't get busted for toking in Tacoma or elsewhere in Washington (though you could get a ticket for public use), it will be a year before selling or buying it is legal.