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Friday, October 23, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Federal, local law enforcement warn of surge in illicit opioid trade in Spokane

Fentanly seizures in Eastern Washington have increased nearly 200% this year, federal law enforcement officials said Wednesday. Pills are being sold on Spokane's streets with lethal dosages of the synthetic opioid that follow prescription painkillers and heroin as the next major, dangerous obstacle in the nation's effort to reduce overdose deaths. 

Sheriff’s Office pushes back against claims of Spokane protester arrested Sunday

Jeremy Logan spoke to national news media outlet Huffington Post this week, linking his own experience with law enforcement in Spokane on Sunday with other stories that have emerged nationwide alleging peaceful protesters have been taken into custody. His arrest occurred before a Sunday afternoon event protesting the shooting of Jacob Blake by law enforcement in Wisconsin. Spokane County Sheriff's Cpl. Mark Gregory said Friday that Logan was arrested by members of the office wearing badges, pursuant to a warrant issued in Douglas County for his arrest in November 2013.

Coronavirus disrupts supply of illicit drugs, affecting potency, availability, prices

The coronavirus pandemic has disrupted supply chains, making it harder for shoppers to find meat, cleaning supplies and toilet paper on the shelves of local stores. But the disease – and the restrictions put in place to slow its spread – has also reduced the availability of illicit drugs, some medical and law enforcement professionals believe.

Doctors: Execution drugs could help COVID-19 patients

Secrecy surrounding executions could hinder efforts by a group of medical professionals who are asking the nation’s death penalty states for medications used in lethal injections so that they can go to coronavirus patients who are on ventilators, according to a death penalty expert and a doctor who’s behind the request.