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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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EPA, Kaiser cleanup of former smelter in Mead shows evolution in environmental understanding

In the early 1970s, park officials and neighborhood advocates rejoiced in the addition of a new public park where an outfall pipe from the Kaiser smelting plant met Deadman Creek. Fifty years later, environmental regulators and the former owners of the property are trying to stop that flow, based on new knowledge about the harm of asbestos and other chemicals. 

Ongoing Latah Creek cleanup efforts receive $1.75 million boost from state

Latah Creek's pollution is due largely to agricultural runoff and soil erosion along its 60 miles stretching from west of Spokane down into north central Idaho. The Washington Ecology Department has issued a new round of funding intending to incentivize farmers to adopt methods that don't churn up the soil and stabilize creek beds.

Cannabis Science Task Force moves to the Department of Ecology

The Cannabis Science Task Force is charged with recommending science-based analytical methods, method validation protocols, performance criteria, proficiency testing, and homogenization procedures for testing cannabis and cannabis products.

House, Senate advance plans to regulate CO2 emissions from cars

The state’s environmental agency would have more power to regulate carbon dioxide pollution under proposals approved by committees in both legislative chambers Thursday, despite efforts by Republicans to trim back that authority.

Ecology director resigning

Washington Ecology Director Maia Bellon will resign at the end of the year, she announced Monday.

Ecology officials offer answers about controversial ‘variance’ for pollutants in Spokane River

State regulators hope to publish in the spring their proposed rules governing discharge of polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs, into the Spokane River. Businesses and governments say the limit imposed by the federal government, currently under review, is too stringent to be met with current technology, while conservation groups worry a new, less strict temporary standard won’t protect the health of the community.