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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Editorial: Final say on community rights

The Supreme Court found all four of the “rights” asserted in the initiative to be out of bounds. The rationale was simple: This is the wrong jurisdiction for your complaints.

Washington Supreme Court rules against Envision Spokane

The Washington state Supreme Court sided against Envision Spokane in a case related to its 2013 ballot initiative, which was taken off the ballot by the Superior Court. The state’s highest court said that the initiative exceeded “the scope of local initiative power and should not be put on the ballot.”

Spokane voters reject worker bill of rights

A controversial measure to bolster worker rights in Spokane failed at the polls tonight, as 62 percent of voters rejected it. City of Spokane Proposition 1 would have amended the city charter to require large employers to pay workers a “family wage,” ensure equal pay for equal work regardless of gender or race and add protections against termination. The measure would make the rights of corporations secondary to people’s rights.

Truth-testing Spokane City Council candidates

The ballots are out, and candidates want your vote. But getting your vote can be a tricky proposition, so they try all kinds of methods. Pictures of them and their smiling spouse and kids. Dramatic commercials. A little bit of mud thrown at their opponent.

Election preview: Spokane Proposition 1, the Worker Bill of Rights

Spokane Proposition 1, the Worker Bill of Rights, is a four-pronged proposition that would amend the city charter to require large employers to pay workers a “family wage,” ensure equal pay for equal work regardless of gender or race and add protections against termination.

Judge rejects Condon’s attempt to block vote on worker rights

A Superior Court judge on Thursday denied Spokane Mayor David Condon’s request to block Envision Spokane’s Worker Bill of Rights from appearing on the Nov. 3 ballot, saying that the state Supreme Court generally rules against preventing an election from occurring. “There is a process that the court has to give some respect to,” said Judge Salvatore Cozza.

Judge rules against mayor, allows Envision to appear on November ballot

A Superior Court judge denied Spokane Mayor David Condon’s request to block Envision Spokane’s Worker Bill of Rights from appearing on the Nov. 3 ballot this afternoon, saying that the state Supreme Court generally rules that “it is not a favored act to restrain or prevent an election to occur.”

City responds to Envision claim

The city of Spokane asserted the mayor’s right to “initiate and control litigation” in a court document Wednesday, a claim aimed at Envision Spokane, which argued earlier in the week that the mayor didn’t have the authority to block its Worker Bill of Rights from November’s ballot. In a 12-page response, the city argued that “time is of the essence” for the Spokane County Superior Court to act and strip Envision’s measure from the ballot. Superior Court Judge Salvatore Cozza will hear the case today.

City to Envision: Mayor can “initiate and control” lawsuits

The city of Spokane asserted the mayor’s right to “initiate and control litigation” in a court document today, a charge aimed at Envision Spokane, which yesterday argued that the mayor didn’t have the authority to block its Worker Bill of Rights from November’s ballot.

Envision Spokane: Mayor doesn’t have authority to block measure from reaching ballot

Envision Spokane is pushing back against Mayor David Condon, who last week sued to keep the group’s Worker Bill of Rights from appearing on the city’s general election ballot in November. In an official response to the city’s lawsuit, which was filed at Condon’s direction, the group argues that the mayor doesn’t have the authority to prevent the measure from reaching the ballot, and that only a supermajority of City Council members can block any initiative from appearing before voters.

Envision moves to block Condon suit against Worker measure

Envision Spokane is pushing back against Mayor David Condon, who last week sued to keep the group’s Worker Bill of Rights from appearing on general election November ballot. In a response to Condon’s lawsuit, the group argues that the mayor doesn’t have the authority to prevent the measure from reaching the ballot, and that only a supermajority of council members can vote to block any initiative from appearing before voters.

Shawn Vestal: People, not city, should vote on workers’ bill of rights

Are we confused, electorate? I know I am. On one hand, the city of Spokane has, in essence, sued its citizens on behalf of corporations, trying to prevent voters from getting even a peek at an initiative that would enshrine the kinds of workers’ rights that give the business community the night terrors. On the same day, the city sued a corporation on behalf of a river – perhaps as Sierra Clubby a move as we can ever expect from the administration of David Condon.

Condon sues to keep Envision’s Worker Bill of Rights off ballot

Spokane Mayor David Condon is trying to block the Worker Bill of Rights from appearing on the November ballot just a week after the City Council approved the measure for the ballot. The latest measure put forth by Envision Spokane – the group’s fourth to qualify for the ballot – would amend the city charter to require large employers to pay workers a “family wage,” ensure equal pay for equal work regardless of gender or race, and make it more difficult to terminate workers. The measure would make the rights of a corporation secondary to people’s rights.

Workers Bill of Rights proposal qualifies for Spokane ballot

Enough signatures have been collected in Spokane to put a proposed Workers Bill of Rights charter amendment on this November’s ballot. If passed, the newest measure put forth by Envision Spokane would amend the city charter to require large employers to pay workers a “family wage,” ensure equal pay for equal work regardless of gender or race, and make it more difficult to terminate workers. The measure would make the rights of a corporation secondary to people’s rights.

Court orders initiative vote

Envision Spokane, the twice-failed initiative seeking to bolster environmental protection and neighborhood and labor rights, will be before voters again, after a decision Thursday by a state appellate court. The ruling reverses a 2013 decision by a Superior Court judge to remove the controversial measure from that year’s general election ballot. The court ordered the city to put the measure on the next available ballot.