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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Marijuana extract sharply cuts seizures in severe form of epilepsy

An oil derived from the marijuana plant sharply reduces violent seizures in young people suffering from a rare, severe form of epilepsy, according to a study published Wednesday that gives more hope to parents who have been clamoring for access to the medication. Cannabidiol cut the median number of monthly convulsive seizures from 12.4 to 5.9 in 52 children with Dravet syndrome who took the medication over a 14-week test period, according to research published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Fifty-six children using a placebo saw the number of seizures drop only from a median of 14.9 to 14.1 per month.

Event advances epilepsy profile, research

Most residents know lilac is Spokane’s color. But most probably don’t know that lilac or purple is also the color of epilepsy awareness. Chris Engle knows. Engle was diagnosed with epilepsy “out of the blue” shortly after his 20th birthday in 2007. Two tonic-clonic – also known as grand mal – seizures in two days sent him to the emergency room, where he had yet another seizure.

Judge gives burglar maximum sentence

Testifying as a victim, a federal judge Wednesday explained how a prolific South Hill burglar traumatized his family, forcing him night after night to explain to his young children that they would be safe to sleep through the night. The family of the admitted burglar, 32-year-old Nathan D. Moore, then launched an emotional plea for leniency in Spokane County Superior Court, blaming his bizarre behavior on adverse reactions to new medications used to control debilitating seizures.

Girl undergoes brain surgery

So many things can happen to kids as they grow up. They fall out of trees. They get chicken pox and blisters and hit in the head with balls. They fall off bikes. Parents know and expect this and fix things with bandages and hugs and kisses. Sometimes a Band-Aid will not do. Sometimes, a healthy 12-year-old girl wakes up one day and has a seizure. Then she has another one. And within a month she has as many as 20 seizures a day. Nothing can stop them – no drugs, no other treatment – and at one point exasperated physicians and specialists recommend inducing a coma to give the girl a break.

Girl undergoes brain surgery

So many things can happen to kids as they grow up. They fall out of trees. They get chicken pox and blisters and hit in the head with balls. They fall off bikes. Parents know and expect this and fix things with bandages and hugs and kisses. Sometimes a Band-Aid will not do. Sometimes, a healthy 12-year-old girl wakes up one day and has a seizure. Then she has another one. And within a month she has as many as 20 seizures a day – nothing can stop them, no drugs, no other treatment, and at one point exasperated physicians and specialists recommend inducing a coma to give the girl a break.

Epilepsy medicine can hamper sex life

Q. Does Topamax cause complete lack of sexual desire? And I do mean complete! A. Topamax (topiramate) is prescribed for epilepsy, but it also is used to prevent migraine headaches. Your short question implies a lot of frustration and sent us hunting for an answer.