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Wednesday, October 28, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Foreigner to make first appearance at the Spokane County fair

When Foreigner takes the Grandstand stage at the Spokane County Interstate Fair on Wednesday, it will feel like the first time. Which is appropriate, considering that it will be the group’s first show at the fair and first in Spokane since August 2014.

Review: Jackie Chan gets his ‘Taken’ moment with ‘The Foreigner’

Chan co-stars as a man seeking vengeance for the death of his daughter in a bloody London bombing. His counterpart is a grizzled former 007 himself, Pierce Brosnan, growling his way into a meaty and morally ambiguous role as former IRA member and Irish Deputy Minister Liam Hennessy, attempting to politick his way around the aftermath of the bombing, which is claimed by a rouge IRA cell.

Hot-blooded hit-makers

A lot of bands from the late ’70s can claim to be elder statesmen of that era’s rock ’n’ roll scene, but Foreigner puts many of them to shame. The group was formed in 1976 by Mick Jones, formerly of the British rock band Spooky Tooth, and Ian McDonald, a founding member of influential prog rockers King Crimson. While the lineup has changed a number of times over the years, Foreigner has never quit performing.

‘The Foreigner’ succeeds on multiple levels

Larry Shue’s “The Foreigner” isn’t so much a comedy about mistaken identity as it is about convenient omission. The titular character is confused for someone he isn’t and chooses to play along with it. In assuming a role of an immigrant lost in translation, he learns about himself and the strangers around him. The show, which is currently playing at Interplayers Theatre, is set in a fishing lodge outside of Atlanta in the early 1980s. Our protagonist is Charlie Baker, an unassuming British traveler who is distraught, he says, because his wife is wasting away in the hospital back at home. He tells his traveling companion Sgt. LeSueur, an explosives expert in the British Army, that he doesn’t want to speak to anybody in his fragile emotional condition, so LeSueur convinces the lodge’s owner that Charlie can’t speak a word of English.

‘The Foreigner’ succeeds on multiple levels

Larry Shue’s “The Foreigner” isn’t so much a comedy about mistaken identity as it is about convenient omission. The titular character is confused for someone he isn’t and chooses to play along with it. In assuming a role of an immigrant lost in translation, he learns about himself and the strangers around him. The show, which is currently playing at Interplayers Theatre, is set in a fishing lodge outside of Atlanta in the early 1980s. Our protagonist is Charlie Baker, an unassuming British traveler who is distraught, he says, because his wife is wasting away in the hospital back at home. He tells his traveling companion Sgt. LeSueur, an explosives expert in the British Army, that he doesn’t want to speak to anybody in his fragile emotional condition, so LeSueur convinces the lodge’s owner that Charlie can’t speak a word of English.