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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Tuesday, October 20, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Cabinet of curiosities: 15,000 ink samples at Secret Service

In a cabinet inside a modest laboratory in downtown Washington are rows and rows of ink samples in plastic squeeze bottles and small glass jars. To the untrained eye, it’s just a bunch of blackish liquid with strange names like “moldy sponge” or “green grass.” But to the U.S. Secret Service agents who use the samples, they are the clues that could save the president from an assassination attempt. Or stop a counterfeit ring. Or identify the D.C. sniper.

The Sun rises in new play about Murdoch’s tabloid revolution

Rupert Murdoch has power, wealth – and legions of detractors, who say the media mogul’s tabloids and TV stations have fueled crass celebrity culture, phone hacking and fake news. A new play in London explores the roots of his success and his divisiveness.

Ink, Spark Center make it official on Friday

Ink Artspace and the Spark Center, after a year of shacking up, are getting hitched. The two nonprofits – one that aims to create a vibrant arts culture, the other that adds health, tech and education components to the mix – have officially joined forces and will reveal a new name on Friday at a Golden Spike ceremony.

Ink highlights superhero visions in new space

Superheroes are all around us: at the movies, on TV, in comic books. This summer, roughly 200 children have been creating their own superheroes as part of a class called Origin Stories, presented by Ink Artspace. Today, several dozen of the kids’ comic books will be on display as part of First Friday.

Tomatillo quiche fits all appetites

This Dinner Together almost didn’t come together at all. I scorched my pinky. I neglected the kids’ dinner. I nearly roasted the tomatillos into oblivion. Despite the challenges, the final result was delicious.

Downtown art, writing hub Ink aims to build community

The narrow art space at Ink is mostly empty for now, old brick walls and wood floors illuminated by strings of shop lights. Mismatched chairs line the walls, and a heavy bench, rescued from the trash, anchors the north end. But the group of writers, artists and teachers behind the soon-to-be-officially nonprofit organization sees a collapsible stage in there, a screen-printing press, big communal tables for writing and visual-art classes. Maybe they’ll show movies on the new drywall.

Do Your Part: Always consider recycling solutions

Stumped on what to do with stuff you can’t toss in the recycling bin? Don’t trash it before finding out how to do your part with even the trickiest of items. Here are my “Top 5 Solutions to Your Recycling Problems”.

It can pay to recycle ink, toner cartridges

Did you know that Americans use hundreds of millions of ink and toner cartridges for printers every year? And estimates are that 70 percent of those are being sent straight to landfills. This is enormously wasteful and unnecessary. These predominantly plastic containers filled with ink are easily refilled or recycled. In fact, there are now a number of places that will actually pay you to recycle your used ink and toner cartridges.

Printer cartridge makers come under fire

KANSAS CITY, Mo. – An ounce of filet mignon can cost you $1 at your grocery store, and the butcher won’t hesitate to quote you the price. But the cost of ink for your computer’s printer? It can rival the cost of caviar – and you won’t be able to pin down the price because the companies that make those expensive little cartridges don’t want to tell you how much ink they contain.

Patrons of art produce it, too

Justin Lentz and Kurt Schmierer wear many hats. They are art supporters and appreciators, they are businessmen and decorators, they are keepers of history and they are artists.

Patrons of art produce it, too

Justin Lentz and Kurt Schmierer wear many hats. They are art supporters and appreciators, they are businessmen and decorators, they are keepers of history and they are artists.

Patrons of art produce it too

Justin Lentz and Kurt Schmierer wear many hats. They are art supporters and appreciators, they are businessmen and decorators, they are keepers of history, and they are artists.

Local card makers find success from basement

It’s been fun for Ryan and Heidi Miller running their mom-and-pop greeting card company out of the basement studio of their Mead home. Their homegrown firm, Mango Ink, continues to find new customers who enjoy well-made custom-designed cards. The writing on their wall – literally, the paperwork from orders coming over the Web from all over the planet – tells them they’ll be leaving the nest within a year.