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Friday, October 30, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Parents want to ensure children can attend their neighborhood schools

Having your child attend the elementary school in your neighborhood seems like a given. It’s not possible for all Spokane Public Schools students, however, because their neighborhood schools are full, sometimes with children from other neighborhoods whose parents have “choiced” them in.

District classes will get bigger

The Spokane school board voted 4-1 Wednesday to temporarily raise class sizes by up to three students. The move, when coupled with adjustments for enrollment declines, will result in the elimination of about 90 full-time teaching positions and a savings of $5 million. Spokane Public Schools administrators expect a budget gap for 2011-’12 between $9 million and $12 million, depending on what state lawmakers decide during the ongoing special session.

Board votes unanimously to move Jefferson Elementary

After a year of analysis, traffic and home sale surveys and hundreds of public comments, the Spokane Public Schools board unanimously voted Wednesday to rebuild Jefferson Elementary School on the west side of Hart Field. “We are not just looking at painting Jefferson or fixing the front steps; we are looking at what’s best for the children’s education” now and in the future, said school board member Rocky Treppiedi, adding that spending $2 million to $4 million more in taxpayer money to build in the current location is not appropriate.

Spokane school board OKs budget, avoiding cuts and layoffs

The board of Spokane Public Schools adopted a $316.8 million budget Wednesday for the 2010-’11 school year without much fanfare. No gaps, no massive cuts and no big rounds of layoffs. Instead, the district has some money to invest in dropout prevention programs to address a 29 percent dropout rate, beef up math and science programs and increase online class options.

Snyder clinches seat on council

Mike Allen conceded his Spokane City Council seat Thursday to magazine publisher Jon Snyder. Because Allen was appointed to his seat to fill a vacancy, Snyder will take office as soon as the vote is certified. That’s expected Nov. 24.

Snyder extends lead; fire bond still trailing

A fresh batch of election results Wednesday inched incumbent Spokane City Councilman Mike Allen closer to defeat. With about 70 percent of what is expected to be the final number of ballots counted, Out There Monthly publisher Jon Snyder leads Allen with 52.5 percent of the vote.

Tight races remain close

A fresh batch of election results Wednesday inched incumbent Spokane City Councilman Mike Allen closer to defeat. With about 70 percent of what is expected to be the final number of ballots counted, Out There Monthly publisher Jon Snyder leads Allen with 52.5 percent of the vote.

Six vie for two seats on school board

Math curriculum, all-day kindergarten and tight budgets are a few of the issues facing the Spokane School Board in upcoming months. Two board incumbents – Rocky Treppiedi and Jeff Bierman – hope they will be elected to stay and address those issues.