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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Past opinions provide perspective

Looking Back reviews opinions published in The Spokesman-Review during this week in history. JFK assassination, Nov 27, 1963

JFK files release is Trump’s latest clash with spy agencies

WASHINGTON – It was a showdown 25 years in the making: With the world itching to finally get a look at classified Kennedy assassination files, and the deadline for their release just hours away, intelligence officials were still angling for a way to keep their secrets. President Donald Trump, the one man able to block the release, did not appreciate their persistence. He did not intend to make this easy. Like much else surrounding investigations of the 1963 killing of President John F. Kennedy, this week’s release of 2,800 records from the JFK files was anything but smooth. It came together only at the last minute, with White House lawyers still fielding late-arriving requests for additional redactions in the morning and an irritated Trump continuing to resist signing off on the request, according to an account by two White House officials. They spoke only on condition of anonymity to discuss internal discussions.

Botulism pills, the CIA, the mob and the JFK assassination

WASHINGTON – Botulism pills. Conspiracy theories. What the government might have known and still won’t say about Lee Harvey Oswald. The release of thousands of records relating to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy hasn’t settled the best-known, real-life whodunit in American history. But the record offered riveting details of the way intelligence services operated at the time and are striving to keep some particulars a secret even now.

Trump frustrated by intelligence community’s JFK secrecy

WASHINGTON – It was a showdown 25 years in the making: With the world itching to finally get a look at classified Kennedy assassination files, and the deadline for their release just hours away, intelligence officials were still angling for a way to keep their secrets. President Donald Trump, the one man able to block the release, did not appreciate their persistence. He did not intend to make this easy. Like much else surrounding investigations of the 1963 killing of President John F. Kennedy, Thursday’s release of 2,800 records from the JFK files was anything but smooth. It came together only at the last minute, with White House lawyers still fielding late-arriving requests for additional redactions in the morning and an irritated Trump continuing to resist signing off on the request, according to an account by two White House officials. They spoke only on condition of anonymity to discuss internal discussions.

On JFK documents, Trump squeezed over disclosure

President Donald Trump is caught in a push-pull on new details of John F. Kennedy’s assassination, jammed between students of the killing who want every scrap of information and intelligence agencies that are said to be counseling restraint. How that plays out should be known Thursday, when long-secret files are expected to be released.

What could be in the long-secret JFK files?

For decades, the existence of secret government files linked to President John F. Kennedy’s assassination has helped fuel conspiracy theories that others besides Lee Harvey Oswald were involved in his murder. Now the public is going to get a deeper look at the collection.

Will Trump allow release of secret JFK assassination papers?

The anticipated release of thousands of never-seen government documents related to President John F. Kennedy’s assassination has scholars and armchair detectives buzzing. Now, they’re waiting to see whether President Donald Trump will block the release of files that could shed light on a tragedy that has stirred conspiracy theories for decades.

Thousands turn out to remember JFK on 100th BD

Americans turned out by the thousands Monday to celebrate the life and legacy of President John F. Kennedy on the day he would have turned 100. What do you consider JFK's legacy?