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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Tuesday, October 20, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Hanford whistleblower case settles for $5.5 million in total fines

Eight years ago, Salina Savage took on government contractors who had used a shell company to prevent legitimate businesses from receiving lucrative jobs at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. The Richland-based whistleblower’s case finally settled this week, generating more than $5.5 million in fines against the company and a total of $690,000 paid to Savage for alerting the government to the swindle.

Westport man pleads guilty in Spokane to $65 million biofuels scheme

A Westport man, who until recently worked an alternative fuels company that operated in both Moses Lake and Pasco, was sentenced Wednesday to 6 1/2 years in prison after investigators discovered that he defrauded taxpayers and fuel producers out of about $65 million.

Bike bandit pleads guilty to nine counts

A hooded, BMX bike-riding Spokane man who terrorized local bank tellers for almost a year pleaded guilty Thursday in federal court to nine counts of armed bank robbery that netted more than $166,000. Lucas G. Woodard, 34, faces between 17 and 22 years in prison after admitting he was the so-called Bicycle Bandit. Woodard would don a hooded sweatshirt, cover his face, display a black handgun and ask tellers to count backward from 500 before he pedaled away on his bike.

Judge rejects request to unseal FBI affidavit in Harpham case

A federal judge ruled Thursday that preserving a fair trial for domestic terrorism suspect Kevin W. Harpham outweighs the public’s right to know what evidence the federal agents gathered to justify charges against him. U.S. District Court Judge Justin L. Quackenbush decided against a request brought by The Spokesman-Review, with support from the Seattle Times and the Associated Press, to unseal the 35-page probable cause affidavit that describes why federal investigators arrested Harpham in connection with a bomb left along the planned route of the Jan. 17 Martin Luther King Jr. Day Unity March in downtown Spokane.

U.S. attorney wants Harpham records sealed

Federal authorities want to block the unsealing of court records related to the arrest of domestic terrorism suspect Kevin W. Harpham. In a 13-page response Wednesday to a request by The Spokesman-Review, with support from the Seattle Times and the Associated Press, Assistant U.S. Attorney Joseph Harrington argued against unsealing the documents, citing an ongoing investigation and concerns about pretrial publicity.

Father of bomb plot suspect calls arrest a setup

The father of domestic terrorism suspect Kevin W. Harpham said he believes his son was set up by someone wanting to pocket the big reward posted by the FBI. “They put out a reward for $20,000, and one of his slimy friends turned him in for the money,” Cecil Harpham, 68, of Kettle Falls, Wash., said Tuesday. “Now, the government won’t admit it to me, but I happen to know it’s true.”

Dad of bomb suspect thinks son was set up

The father of domestic terrorism suspect Kevin W. Harpham said he believes his son was set up by someone wanting to pocket the big reward posted by the FBI.

Suspected would-be bomber pleads not guilty

Kevin W. Harpham pleaded not guilty Wednesday to charges that he left a bomb that investigators say could have caused multiple casualties along the planned route of a Unity March to celebrate Martin Luther King Jr. Day. Assistant U.S. Attorney Joe Harrington simply read in court the indictment that was handed down late Tuesday by a grand jury. Harpham appeared in an off-white jumpsuit with “Spokane County Jail” stenciled on the back.