Arrow-right Camera
The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
Partly Cloudy Day 45° Partly Cloudy

Tag search results

Tags let us describe our content with keywords, making it easier to find what you're most interested in. Use the search box to look for tags, or explore our coverage with the lists below.

Wildlife concerns lead to pause on plans for water connection to Five Mile development

A $240,000 contract to build a 12-inch water main on the bluffs leading to Five Mile Prairie was nixed by a majority of the City Council earlier this month, who said they were worried about the effect of construction on species of deer and bats that live in the area. Lawmakers also questioned why the city, and not a nearby developer, should pay for the cost of hooking up the system. 

Final fight: Condon, City Council spar over city salaries

On Dec. 30, Condon vetoed the City Council’s changes to the law that governs the Salary Review Commission – a board that sets the salaries of the mayor and city council members –dismayed it did not broaden the scope of the commission’s oversight.

Spokane City Council: Rathbun vs. Stratton

At the Northwest Passages Pints and Politics debate between Spokane School Board and City Council candidates, incumbent Karen Stratton and Andy Rathbun debate the issues as they seek the District 3 seat on the City Council. Debate was October 3, 2019 and held at OverBluff Cellars' tasting room at the Washington Cracker Building in Spokane.

Ethics complaint targets Spokane Councilwoman Karen Stratton’s endorsement of Pasco marijuana business

The complaint filed Friday alleges Stratton violated several portions of the city’s ethical code prohibiting city officials from using public resources to further their own financial interests. The councilwoman said the timing of the complaint, after a letter she wrote last summer had been shared publicly in conservative circles online, indicates it is politically motivated and that she hasn’t benefited financially from the action.

Ties to marijuana businesses are disqualifying bankruptcy filers, including City Councilwoman Karen Stratton

The U.S. Trustee Program, responsible for policing the federal courts’ bankruptcy proceedings, is weeding out cases involving people or firms with ties to state-sanctioned marijuana businesses. Earlier this summer, that included Karen Stratton and her husband, Chris Wright, despite the fact that the majority of their debts were not wrapped up in the family-owned farm they’ve helped operate since 2014.