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Tuesday, October 20, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Judge grounds U.S. Air Force urban training plans in Idaho

BOISE – The U.S. Air Force violated environmental laws by not adequately studying how noise from military jets coordinating exercises with plain-clothed soldiers on the ground in Idaho could harm humans and wildlife, a judge has ruled.

Trooper’s mic records talk of beating, choking Black man

In graphic, matter-of-fact chatter picked up on his body-camera mic, a Louisiana State trooper implicated in the death of a Black man can be heard talking of beating and choking him before “all of a sudden he just went limp.”

Wisconsin justices weigh removal of 130K from voter rolls

The Wisconsin Supreme Court weighed Tuesday whether to go along with conservatives who argue that 130,000 voters should be removed from the rolls in the hotly contested presidential battleground state, while the Democratic attorney general defended not purging them.

Lawsuit asks court to force Facebook to ban militia posts

Facebook can't be trusted to enforce its ban on violent rhetoric in the run-up to the November elections, as is evident by its refusal to remove a group's call to arms to protect businesses in Kenosha last month before a night of unrest in which two protesters were shot and killed, according to a federal lawsuit filed Wednesday.

Cities sue Census Bureau over ending 2020 head count early

More than a half-dozen cities, counties and civil right groups sued the Trump administration Tuesday, saying there was no justification for its decision to cut the 2020 census short by a month, and it will lead to the undercounting of minority communities and an inaccurate head count of every U.S. resident.

Lawsuit against Trump, postal chief seeks proper funding

Several individuals including candidates for public office sued President Donald Trump and the U.S. Postal Service and its new postmaster general in New York on Monday to ensure adequate funding for postal operations.

Georgia governor to drop lawsuit over Atlanta mask mandate

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp on Thursday said he’s dropping a lawsuit against the city of Atlanta in a dispute over the city’s requirement to wear masks in public and other restrictions related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

California judge rules Uber, Lyft drivers are employees

A judge on Monday ordered ride-hailing giants Uber and Lyft to treat their California drivers as employees instead of independent contractors, a shift that would guarantee benefits like overtime, sick leave and expense reimbursement for workers who make up much of the freewheeling gig economy.

McDonald’s sues ousted CEO, alleging employee relationships

McDonald’s says it's suing Stephen Easterbrook, the CEO it ousted last year over an inappropriate relationship with an employee, alleging Monday that he covered up relationships with three other employees and destroyed evidence.

‘See you in court’: ACLU files nearly 400 cases versus Trump

As president, Donald Trump hasn’t personally squared off against the ACLU from the witness stand, but the broader warning has been borne out. As of this week, the ACLU has filed nearly 400 lawsuits and other legal actions against the Trump administration, some meeting with setbacks but many resulting in important victories.

Girl Scouts sex-abuse claim included in NY civil case flurry

As a Girl Scout growing up in upstate New York, Alice Weiss-Russell says she lived with a dark secret: The husband of her troop leader was sexually abusing her in the bathroom of a church basement where scout meetings were held in the 1980s.

Former Excelsior employee files wrongful termination suit out after raising concerns about political activities

Skyler Oberst, employed as development director at the youth treatment center from December 2018 to August 2019, said he was retaliated against after raising concerns about Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers' appearance at a ribbon-cutting ceremony at the facility in fall 2018. The event was organized by the congresswoman's official Congressional staff, and the center says it will defend against the claims of the wrongful termination lawsuit. 

Georgia governor backs out of hearing on Atlanta mask order

Georgia’s governor has withdrawn a request for an emergency hearing in a lawsuit that aims to block the state’s largest city from ordering people to wear masks in public or imposing other restrictions related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Chicago groups sue to bar federal agents from protest duties

A collection of Chicago activist groups want a judge to block federal agents sent to the city to combat violent crime from interfering in or policing protests, arguing in a lawsuit filed Thursday that that the surge ordered by President Donald Trump will inhibit residents' ability to hold demonstrations.

Floyd family sues Minneapolis officers charged in his death

George Floyd's family filed a lawsuit Wednesday against the city of Minneapolis and the four police officers charged in his death, alleging the officers violated Floyd's rights when they restrained him and that the city allowed a culture of excessive force, racism and impunity to flourish in its police force.

Harvard, MIT sue to block ICE rule on international students

Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology filed a federal lawsuit Wednesday challenging the Trump administration's decision to bar international students from staying in the U.S. if they take classes entirely online this fall.