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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Taliban begin talks in Norway as hunger stalks Afghanistan

The closed-door meetings are taking place at a hotel in the snow-capped mountains above the Norwegian capital. On Sunday, Taliban representatives were meeting with women's rights activists and human rights defenders from Afghanistan and from the Afghan diaspora.

New conservative target: Race as factor in COVID-19 treatment

Medical experts say the opposition is misleading. Health officials have long said there is a strong case for considering race as one of many risk factors in treatment decisions. And there is no evidence that race alone is being used to decide who gets medicine.

Last straw: Fed-up Arizona Democrats censure Sen. Sinema

PHOENIX — U.S. Sen. Kyrsten Sinema is growing increasingly isolated from some of her party’s most influential officials and donors after playing a key role in scuttling voting rights legislation that many consider essential to preserving democracy.

Jewish leaders, backers defiant a week after hostage siege

On the eve of her 100th birthday Saturday, Ruth Salton told her daughter she was going one way or another to Friday night Shabbat services at Congregation Beth Israel, just days after a gunman voicing antisemitic conspiracy theories held four worshippers hostage for 10 hours at the Fort Worth-area synagogue.

Kansas teen’s death has spotlight on ‘stand your ground’ law

TOPEKA, Kan. — Kansas lawmakers were thinking of homeowners facing down burglars and people attacked on the street when they wrote a “stand your ground” law more than a decade ago allowing use of deadly force in self defense. They didn't envision it applying to police officers, jail guards or government employees.

Chevron, Total exit Myanmar over deteriorating human rights

Total Energies and Chevron, two of the world's largest energy companies, said Friday they were stopping all operations in Myanmar, citing rampant human rights abuses and deteriorating rule of law since the country's military overthrew the elected government in February.

As 2024 nears, Mike Pence to speak at South Carolina pregnancy center dinner

COLUMBIA, S.C. — As he positions himself for a possible White House bid, former Vice President Mike Pence is returning to the early-voting state of South Carolina, slated to give the keynote address at a fundraising banquet for a Christian pregnancy center that's become a regular stop for GOP presidential hopefuls.

Democrats eye new strategy after failure of voting bill

WASHINGTON — Democrats were picking up the pieces Thursday following the collapse of their top-priority voting rights legislation, with some shifting their focus to a narrower bipartisan effort to repair laws Donald Trump exploited in his bid to overturn the 2020 election.

New approach to teaching race in school divides New Mexico

ALBUQUERQUE — A proposal to overhaul New Mexico’s social studies standards has stirred debate over how race should be taught in schools, with thousands of parents and teachers weighing in on changes that would dramatically increase instruction related to racial and social identity beginning in kindergarten.

Prosecutor: Norway mass killer still ‘a very dangerous man’

OSLO, Norway — A prosecutor in Norway said Thursday that a far-right extremist who killed 77 people in 2011 still is “a very dangerous man” and therefore a poor candidate for release after 10 years in prison, as Norwegian law permits.