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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Feds: Warming imperils wolverines

BILLINGS, Mont. — The tenacious wolverine, a snow-loving carnivore sometimes called the "mountain devil," is being added to the list of species threatened by climate change — a dubious distinction that puts it in the ranks of the polar bear and several other animals that could see their habitats shrink drastically due to warming temperatures. Federal wildlife officials today will propose Endangered Species Act protections for the wolverine in the lower 48 states, a step twice denied under the Bush administration.

Huge DNA code of the Christmas tree being revealed

NEW YORK (AP) — To millions of people, the Christmas tree is a cheerful sight. To scientists who decipher the DNA codes of plants and animals, it's a monster. We're talking about the conifer, the umbrella term for cone-bearing trees like the spruce, fir, pine, cypress and cedar. Apart from their Yuletide popularity, they play big roles in the lumber industry and in healthy forest ecosystems.

Pot legalized in Colo. with gov’s proclamation

DENVER (AP) — Marijuana for recreational use became legal in Colorado Monday, when the governor took a purposely low-key procedural step of declaring the voter-approved change part of the state constitution. Colorado became the second state after Washington to allow pot use without a doctor's recommendation. Both states prohibit public use of the drug, and commercial sales in Colorado and Washington won't be permitted until after regulations are written next year.

Crew tows whale carcass in Malibu out to sea

MALIBU, Calif. (AP) — A tugboat towed the decomposing carcass of a whale from a Malibu beach out to sea, several days after it washed ashore and created a stench near the homes of movie stars and millionaires. The remains of the 40,000-pound fin whale were towed Saturday about 20 miles from shore by a crew hired by a homeowners' association, Los Angeles County Fire Inspector Brian Riley said.

Rotting whale carcass in Malibu towed out to sea

MALIBU, Calif. (AP) — The decaying carcass of a whale that washed onto a California beach was towed out to sea Saturday, five days after it washed ashore and created a stench near the Malibu homes of movie stars and millionaires. A tugboat hired by a homeowners' association towed the carcass of the huge fin whale about 20 miles from shore, Los Angeles County Fire Inspector Brian Riley said.

Rotting whale in Malibu likely left to nature

MALIBU, Calif. (AP) — No government agency is taking action to remove the decaying carcass of a whale on a California beach, making it appear the job will be left to Mother Nature. The corpse of the huge fin whale created a spectacle on Friday as people wandered down the narrow Malibu beach to look at the remains — white bones, rolls of blubber and the tail flukes trailing along the water's edge.

Rotting whale becomes sad spectacle in Malibu

MALIBU, Calif. (AP) — The decaying corpse of a huge fin whale was a sad spectacle Friday on the shore of a cove where it washed ashore nearly a week earlier. With no government agency taking action to remove the rapidly rotting mammal from Little Dume beach, it appeared that the job would be left to decomposition and nature's scavengers.

Rotting whale casts foul stench into Malibu

MALIBU, Calif. (AP) — A dead whale rotting near the Malibu homes of Barbra Streisand, Bob Dylan and other celebrities is causing a gigantic cleanup problem as authorities try to decide who's responsible for getting rid of it. Los Angeles County lifeguards planned to try to pull the 40,000-pound carcass out to sea at high tide, said Cindy Reyes, executive director of the California Wildlife Center.

Legal pot in Wash. state - questions and answers

SEATTLE (AP) — Marijuana became legal under Washington state law Thursday. So, bong hits and funny brownies for everybody? Not quite. Pot legalization in the Evergreen State has raised many questions, some that likely won't be answered for a while. Here's a quick primer:

APNewsBreak: Feds funnel millions into Gulf Coast

HOUSTON (AP) — Days before a newly formed council focuses on long-term Gulf of Mexico cleanup, a report released to The Associated Press shows that one federal agency has committed more than a half-billion dollars to the region in the past two years, nearly one-fifth of it on projects directly linked to recovery from the 2010 oil spill. The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Natural Resources Conservation Service, one of the so-called "trustees" involved in divvying up projects and cash from a settlement with BP PLC, detailed in a progress report it will present next week at the meeting in Mobile, Ala., its Gulf Coast projects, the money it has invested and the acres impacted. The report was released to the AP in advance.

Upon further review, giant sequoia tops a neighbor

FRESNO, Calif. (AP) — Deep in the Sierra Nevada, the famous General Grant giant sequoia tree is suffering its loss of stature in silence. What once was the world's No. 2 biggest tree has been supplanted thanks to the most comprehensive measurements taken of the largest living things on Earth. The new No. 2 is The President, a 54,000-cubic-foot gargantuan not far from the Grant in Sequoia National Park. After 3,240 years, the giant sequoia still is growing wider at a consistent rate, which may be what most surprised the scientists examining how the sequoias and coastal redwoods will be affected by climate change and whether these trees have a role to play in combatting it.

Upon further review, giant sequoia tops a neighbor

FRESNO, Calif. (AP) — Deep in the Sierra Nevada, the famous General Grant giant sequoia tree is suffering its loss of stature in silence. What once was the world's No. 2 biggest tree has been supplanted thanks to the most comprehensive measurements taken of the largest living things on Earth. The new No. 2 is The President, a 54,000-cubic-foot gargantuan not far from the Grant in Sequoia National Park. After 3,240 years, the giant sequoia still is growing wider at a consistent rate, which may be what most surprised the scientists examining how the sequoias and coastal redwoods will be affected by climate change and whether these trees have a role to play in combatting it.

Study: Like a tree, growth rings show lobster age

PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — For the first time, scientists have figured out how to determine the age of a lobster — by counting its rings, like a tree. Nobody knows how old lobsters can live to be; some people estimate they live to more than 100.

‘Sneaker waves’ blamed for deaths of Calif. family

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Howard Kuljian and his family were out for a walk on a damp, overcast morning at Big Lagoon beach, playing fetch with their dog Fran as 10-foot surf churned the water just feet away like a washing machine. Signs near the beach warned of "sneaker waves," the kind that suddenly roar ashore.

Family swept out to sea in attempt to save dog

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Howard Kuljian and his family were out for a walk on a damp, overcast morning at Big Lagoon beach, playing fetch with their dog Fran as 10-foot surf churned the water just feet away like a washing machine. Signs near the beach warned of "sneaker waves," the kind that suddenly roar ashore.

N. California community mourns family swept to sea

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Howard Kuljian and his family were out for a walk on a damp, overcast morning at Big Lagoon beach, playing fetch with their dog Fran as 10-foot surf churned the water just feet away like a washing machine. Signs near the beach warned of "sneaker waves," the kind that suddenly roar ashore.

Northern CA community mourns family swept to sea

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Howard Kuljian and his family were out for a walk on a damp, overcast morning at Big Lagoon beach, playing fetch with their dog as 10-foot surf churned the water just feet away like a washing machine. Signs near the beach warned of "sneaker waves," the kind that suddenly roar ashore.

Bill to give hunters, fishermen more land access

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sportsmen might soon have more access to federal lands and be able to bring home as trophies 41 polar bears killed in Canada before the government started protecting the animals as a threatened species. Favorable action Monday by the Senate on a wide-ranging hunting-fishing bill means it could be enacted before Christmas if the House goes along. The White House has already indicated its support.

Search ends for boy swept to sea in California

EUREKA, Calif. (AP) — The Coast Guard ended a search Monday for a teenager whose parents were killed when the three family members tried to rescue their dog from powerful surf in Northern California. Powerful, 10-foot waves pulled the dog into the ocean Saturday as it ran to retrieve a stick at Big Lagoon, north of Eureka, authorities said.

All items in ‘12 Days of Christmas’ now top $107K

PITTSBURGH (AP) — Add seven swans, six geese and five golden rings to the list of Christmas gifts that cost more than they did a year ago. And if you get all 364 items repeated throughout "The Twelve Days of Christmas" carol, you'll pay 6.1 percent more this year, according to the so-called Christmas Price Index that PNC Wealth Management updates annually.