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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Verner, Upthegrove top lands commissioner field

Community outreach and internal communication were not Goldmark’s strengths. DNR has been beat up over the recent wildfire seasons, and morale is low. Fresh leadership is on the way, but shoring up the agency won’t be easy.

Most recent Playfair sale compounds city’s losses

The legacy of Playfair Race Course is on display at the commercial park that took its place, as blue steel silhouettes of horse and jockey appear to race across the park’s entryway. Another legacy of the racetrack remains at Spokane City Hall, this one in red ink.

Damage unclear as wildfires sweep region

Much of the devastation from numerous out-of-control Northwest wildfires fanned by high winds was unclear Saturday as officials scrambled to pull in more firefighting resources and douse the flames. There were certainly dozens of homes lost, and hundreds of evacuations remained in place Saturday. A woman died while evacuating the Lawyer Complex in Idaho, according to the Lewiston Tribune.

Doug Clark: What will happen if mayoral hex comes undone?

"I ’m not intimidated by old history, I know Spokane is willing to embrace a good strong mayor for the future of Spokane for a second term.” – A confident pre-election 2011 Mayor Mary Verner discussing her chances of breaking Spokane’s Curse of the One-Term Mayor. We’re officially a tad more than a month away from Spokane’s Aug. 4 primary election and an excellent question has arrived by email from Paul Baxter, a civic-minded and loyal reader.

Gov. Inslee declares drought emergency throughout Washington state

OLYMPIA – Washington has a statewide drought emergency that will likely lead some farmers to go without water for their crops and some small water districts to look at reductions for  their customers. Historic low snowpack in many of the state’s mountain ranges prompted Gov. Jay Inslee to expand the drought emergency to the entire state Friday morning. Earlier in the year he had issued emergency declarations for some regions that rely heavily on snow runoff from the Cascades or Olympics, as well as Yakima and some parts of southeastern Washington.

Drought emergency for all of Washington

OLYMPIA -- Washington has a statewide drought emergency that will likely lead to some farmers going without water for their crops and some small water districts looking at reductions for customers. The state is bracing for $1.2 billion in crop losses and another tough wildfire season this summer.

Washington in drought emergency

OLYMPIA -- Washington has a statewide drought emergency that will likely lead to some farmers going without water for their crops and some small water districts looking at reductions for customers. The state is bracing for $1.2 billion in crop losses and another tough wildfire season this summer.

Mild winter yields low snowpack, water reserves

OLYMPIA – There’s a big downside to the relatively mild winter with more rain than snow that most of Washington experienced, and it’s not for skiers and snowboarders. Parts of the state have a snowpack drought. Gov. Jay Inslee declared a drought emergency Friday for the Olympic Peninsula, much of the eastern slope of the Cascades and the Walla Walla region, triggering special authority for state agencies to address what they expect to be water shortages for agriculture, fish and some rural water systems. Most urban water systems are expected to have adequate drinking water, and the dams along the Columbia River should have plenty of water to turn the turbines and pump out electricity.

Central Washington residents say Natural Resources failed them in battling Carlton Complex fires

OLYMPIA – Government agencies failed to react fast enough to smaller fires that grew last July into the largest wildfire in state history, Central Washington residents told legislators Thursday. While Department of Natural Resources officials defended their efforts to battle the Carlton Complex in hot, dry, windy conditions, Okanogan County officials and residents accused them of being disorganized and ill-prepared. They’re worried about a repeat this summer, when weather conditions are expected to be similar.

Spokane mayor to decline $7,000 pay raise

Facing public pressure and criticism from the City Council, Spokane Mayor David Condon said Wednesday he will not take a $7,000 pay increase as planned in his 2015 budget proposal. Condon’s salary was set to climb to nearly $180,000, which would almost match that of Seattle’s mayor. The increase in pay sparked an uproar, and the City Council said the budget didn’t reflect the “community’s values.”